Twiggy the New Face of L’Oréal!

Lesley Lawson formerly Hornby was born 19 September 1949 (65 years old) widely known by the nickname Twiggy, is an English model, actress and singer. Known for her thin build (thus her nickname) and her androgynous look consisting of large blue eyes, long eyelashes, and short blonde hair.

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The Secret for Making Your Blowout Last Longer or Going Between Shampoos Longer!

On day
2
Or
3
After a Blowout or shampoo:

Very lightly spray texturizing spray from the roots to the tips of your hair
Lifting up the roots in 2 inch sections and spraying from 10-12 inches away
After using the texturizing spray flip your hair upside down blast the roots of your hair with a blow dryer

On day
4
Or
5
Very lightly spray at the roots of your hair with a dry shampoo, such as Klorane.
Lifting up the roots in 2 inch sections and spraying from 10-12 inches away.
Use your fingers to lightly blend in any whiteness into your hair.
Finger comb or use a brush with tourmaline bristles to prevent static and to spread the shampoo down the shaft of the hair slightly. You can also do this with the blow dyer on low heat.

Spray dry conditioner verrrry lightly, such as Serge Normant or Kenra, from the mid-shaft/halfway down the hair to the tips avoiding the roots spraying from 10-12 inches away. Or spray onto your palms.
Finger comb mid-shaft to tips.

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Panetone Color of the Year: Marsala 18-1438!

A naturally robust and earthy wine red, Marsala enriches our minds, bodies and souls.

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Marsala is a subtly seductive shade, one that draws us in to its embracing warmth.
Leatrice Eiseman
Executive Director, Pantone Color Institute®

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Marsala is a wine produced in the region surrounding the Italian city of Marsala in Sicily. Marsala first received Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC) status in 1969. The DOC status is equivalent to PDO: most countries limit the use of the term Marsala to those wines that come from the Marsala area, to which the European Union grants Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) status.

While the city’s natives sometimes drink “vintage” Marsala, the wine produced for export is universally fortified similar to Port, Madeira and Sherry. Originally, this addition of alcohol was to ensure that it would last on long ocean voyages, but now it is made that way because of its popularity in foreign markets.

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Titian Beauty: Goddess’ With The Hair!

Titian is a tint of red hair, most commonly described as brownish-orange in color. More so, Titian hair is specifically a bright color, with a tint of golden-brown. It ranges in shades from medium to dark. Like most red hair, it is commonly associated with light features.

The term originates from Titian, an Italian painter who would often depict women with red hair of this description. Titian was was born in 1488/90 A.D. in Pieve di Cadore, and he died in Venice in 1576 A.D. His real name was Tiziano Vermillion, he was a student of, Giovanni Bellini, the leading painter in Venice. His artistic expertise as a great Venetian painter is evident in the fact that from 1515 A.D. onward, he worked for influential families, such as, the d’Este, Gonzaga, Furnace, and Rovere dynasties. He also worked for King Francois I of France. Titian received the Order of the Golden Fleece in 1533 A.D. while working as a court painter to Emperor Charles V. Titian went to Rome in 1545 A.D. to work for Pope Paul III. Later in his life, he worked for Philip II.

Titian has been used as a hair color term in America as early as the 1800s, with women commonly using henna to dye their hair Titian. From 1961 until 1966, all red-haired Barbie dolls were officially labelled “Titian”, with Midge being the staple for the variant. Midge’s packaging illustration featured this hair color, while the Barbie character was typically depicted with blonde hair during this period.

Titian is commonly misused synonymously for other hair colors with similar definitions or hues of color. Titian hair is mistaken with Venetian hair (strawberry blond, Venetian blond or honey blond) frequently due to similar definitions and origins.

Titian hair is also commonly mistaken for auburn hair. While Titian hair is a brownish shade of red hair, auburn hair is a brownish shade of hair encompassing the actual color red. Most definitions of Titian hair describe it as a brownish-orange color, but some describe it as being reddish. This is in reference to red hair itself, not the color red.

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Textile Art: Looking Beyond The Thread!

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Know Your Make Up Brushes!

Some Quotes To Give You Inspiration In The New Year!

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Favorite Products of the Month: January!

OPI Classic Nail Lacquer

Here Today Aragon Tomorrow

 

Olay In-shower

Body Lotion, Quench

Crane Humidifier

Essential Oil of the Month: Anise

Do not confuse Anise seed oil (Pimpinella anisum) with Anise Star oil (Illicium vernum).

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Anise seed has a long history of use as a spice and medicine. It is also employed to flavor liquors. In India and certain other countries, anise is also used as a mouth freshener and digestive agent. The medicinal properties of this herb were known long ago in ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. The essential oil of anise is extracted by steam distillation.

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Used for:

Bronchitis, colds, coughs, flatulence, flu, muscle aches, rheumatism, analgesic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aperitive, carminative, digestive, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, stimulant, and stomachic

Aroma – a top note:

Fresh, sweet, warm, spicy, licorice-like

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Blends with:

Bay, black pepper, ginger, lavender, orange, pine, rose

Anise Oil can be calming when used in very small dilutions.

Caution:

In heavy doses, it has narcotic effects and slows down respiration and circulation. It is poisonous to certain small animals and birds and therefore children should not be given high doses. Furthermore, it may cause irritation to certain skin types. It is best to avoid it during pregnancy. It may also aggravate certain types of cancers caused due to its effect on the estrogen hormone. Do not use without medical supervision.

Beauties of the Month: Paz de la Huerta, Antonia Clarke, Dichen Lachman, Indira Varma, Caterina Murino, and Hana Mae Lee!

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Paz de la Huerta

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Antonia Clarke

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Dichen Lachman

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Indira Varma

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Caterina Murino

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Hana Mae Lee

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