Hayflick Limit Theory of Aging – Life Extension Technology!

Exfoliation brightens the complexion, refines the texture of the skin, minimizes pores and fine lines and promotes circulation for better cellular nutrition. Exfoliation is a good thing. We all know, however, too much of a good thing is not a good thing at all. Deep, frequent exfoliation (microdermabrasion, AHA peels, etc.) that works hard at removing more than its share of cell debris stimulates excessive cell division. That is not a good thing and should be avoided. Seriously. Moderation is the key to a healthy skin care program. But, there is something else . . .

The Hayflick Limit is worthy of serious consideration. During the early 1960s, Leonard Hayflick and Paul Moorhead theorized that since human cells are finite there is only so much cell life and division to go around. Cells can only divide a certain number of times before the division stops and they become senescent (old, sluggish, dying). Senescent cells are dysfunctional, slow, enlarged, interfere with younger cells, and build up the pigment responsible for age spots. The skin of older people has approximately 33% times the senescent cells, and as a result, their skin is more fragile, blotchy and wrinkled.

Aging is a fact of life. It can be graceful or it can be dreadful. The choice, as with most things, is up to each individual. There is a visible need to reduce the rate of cell division to live longer. The bigger question is what on earth can be done about the Hayflick Limit? Avoid excessive exfoliation. Eat properly. Understand the profound health benefits of antioxidants. Maintain a healthy body weight. Exercise. Minimize stress. Use appropriate skin care. Be careful about UV exposure. Live a moderate lifestyle.

The Hayflict Limit is directly connected to the shortening of the telomeres. Telomerase is an enzyme that offers restoration and health to the telomeres. This is exciting life extension technology. Is it time to catch the youth train? Not quite, but the train is definitely on the track.

Tribolium castaneum telomerase catalytic subunit, TERT, bound to an RNA-DNA hairpin designed to resemble the putative RNA-templating region and telomeric DNA

Comments

  1. #mani monday y-day

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