Essential oil of the Month: Ylang Ylang – The Aphrodisiac!

C. odorata is a fast-growing tree of the custard-apple family Annonaceae. The flower is drooping, long-stalked, with six narrow, greenish-yellow (rarely pink) petals, rather like a sea star in appearance, and yields a highly fragrant essential oil. The name ylang-ylang is derived from Tagalog, either from the word ilang, meaning “wilderness”, alluding to its natural habitat, or the word ilang-ilan, meaning “rare”, suggestive of its exceptionally unique scent.It is native to the Philippines and Indonesia and is commonly grown in Polynesia, Melanesia, Micronesia and Comoros Islands.

Scent of ylang ylang: The fragrance is intensely sweet, heady, floral, and slightly spicy, with a narcissus or bananalike overtone.

The essential oil is used in aromatherapy. It is believed to relieve high blood pressure, normalize sebum secretion for skin problems, help you to sleep, and is considered to be an aphrodisiac. It is used to sharpen the senses and to temper depression, fear, anger, and jealousy. For Chakra work, Ylang Ylang Essential Oil is said to help balance the Sacral and Solar Plexus Chakras.  The oil from ylang-ylang is widely used in perfumery for oriental or floral themed perfumes (such as Chanel No. 5).

Ylang Ylang I, II and III:  Ylang Ylang Extra Oil is typically distilled from the flower  via steam for a short duration of time before the essential oil is collected. After oil classified as Ylang Ylang Extra is collected, the distillation process then continues. After a period of time, the distillation process is stopped and the resulting oil is then again collected. That oil is then referred to as Ylang Ylang I. The process repeats, resulting in Ylang Ylang II and Ylang Ylang III. The duration between distillations and the details can vary between distillers. The distillations are generally referred to as fractions and are typically used within fragrancing and perfumery applications.

Blends well with:  Bergamot, chamomile, clary sage, clove, eucalyptus lemon, ginger, grapefruit, jasmine, lemon, litsea cubeba, mandarin, neroli, opopanax, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, peru balsam, petitgrain, rose, rosewood, sandalwood, tuberose, vetiver

 

In Indonesia, ylang-ylang flowers are spread on the bed of newlywed couples. In the Philippines, its flowers, together with the flowers of the sampaguita, are strung into a necklace (lei) and worn by women and used to adorn religious images.

Ylang-ylang’s essential oil makes up 29% of the Comoros’ annual export (1998).

Ylang-ylang is a common flavoring in Madagascar for ice cream.

 

 

 

 

Essential Oil should not be applied directly to the skin but in carrier oils, putting the oils directly on the skin is too harsh due to their concentrated form. Add a few drops of Celery Seed essential oil to the carrier oil.

If you are pregnant, receiving cancer treatment,or have a weakened immune system the use of essential oils is not recommended!

While essential oil will not go rancid, carrier oils can. Store your carrier oils in a cool, dry, and dark place.

Disclaimer

While I’ve attempted to use credible sources for information, this is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment. If there is a disparity between the information presented within this blog and the advice given by your medical professional, please follow the medical professional’s advice as he/she will know you and your medical circumstances.

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