Ginger Essential Oil of the Month: The Stomach Tamer!

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Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is a rhizome it is widely used as a spice or a medicine. It is related to turmeric, cardamom and galangal.

One traditional medical form of ginger historically was called Jamaica ginger; it was classified as a stimulant and carminative and used frequently for dyspepsia, gastroparesis, slow motility symptoms, constipation, and colic. Some studies indicate ginger may provide short-term relief of pregnancy-related nausea and vomiting. Studies are inconclusive about effects for other forms of nausea or in treating pain from rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, or joint and muscle injury. Side effects, mostly associated with powdered ginger, are gas, bloating, heartburn, and nausea.

Tea brewed from ginger is a common folk remedy for colds. Ginger ale and ginger beer are also drunk as stomach settlers in countries where the beverages are made.

  • In Burma, ginger and a local sweetener made from palm tree juice (htan nyat) are boiled together and taken to prevent the flu.
  • In China, ginger is included in several traditional preparations. A drink made with sliced ginger cooked in water with brown sugar or a cola is used as a folk medicine for the common cold. “Ginger eggs” (scrambled eggs with finely diced ginger root) is a common home remedy for coughing. The Chinese also make a kind of dried ginger candy that is fermented in plum juice and sugared, which is also commonly consumed to suppress coughing. Ginger has also been historically used to treat inflammation, which several scientific studies support, though one arthritis trial showed ginger to be no better than a placebo or ibuprofen for treatment of osteoarthritis.
  • In Colombia, ginger is mixed with hot agua de panela to relieve cold and flu-like symptoms.
  • In Congo, ginger is crushed and mixed with mango tree sap to make tangawisi juice, which is considered a panacea.
  • In India, ginger is applied as a paste to the temples to relieve headache, and consumed when suffering from the common cold. Ginger with lemon and black salt is also used for nausea.
  • In Indonesia, it is used as a herbal preparation to reduce fatigue, reducing “winds” in the blood, prevent and cure rheumatism and control poor dietary habits.
  • In Nepal, ginger is is widely grown and used throughout the country as a spice for vegetables, used medically to treat cold and also sometimes used to flavor tea.
  • In the Philippines it is used as a throat lozenge in traditional medicine to relieve sore throat. It is also brewed into a tea known as salabat.
  • In the United States, ginger is used to prevent motion and morning sickness. It is recognized as safe by the Food and Drug Administration and is sold as an unregulated dietary supplement.
  • In Peru, ginger is sliced in hot water as an infusion for stomach aches as infusión de Kión.
  • In Japan it is purported to aid blood circulation. Scientific studies investigating these effects have been inconclusive.

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There are over 1,200 species of Ginger

Ginger comes from a Sanskrit word “srngaveram” meaning “horn root”.

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It has a spicy, sweet, woody and earthy aroma makes one physically energized.

Middle note

The dried root is steam distilled to produce the essential oil.

Chakra: Promotes opening of the sacral (sex) chakra that governs the small intestine. Also helps process the energy of the solar plexus chakra.

Chakra Color: Orange

Blends well with: Bergamot, cedarwood, clove, coriander, eucalyptus, frankincense, geranium, grapefruit, jasmine, juniper, lemon, lime, mandarin, neroli, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, rose, sandalwood, vetiver, and ylang ylang

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Did you know that Ginger has been used in Gingerbread for over 4,000 years? This is as far back as the records show in ancient Greece! Is this the only known sweet that combats nausea?

Did you know that the Romans used it in a wine for aphrodisiac powers?
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