Essential Oil of the Month: Lemongrass!

Essential oil of the month Lemongrass!

Cymbopogon, better known as lemongrass, is a genus of Asian, African, Australian, and tropical island plants (herb) in the grass family.  Lemongrass is widely used as a culinary herb in Asian cuisines prized for its strong citrus flavor with hints of mint and ginger it is also as a medicinal herb in India. In the garden, lemongrass forms a tall, grassy clump 3 to 5 feet tall. Its appearance rivals that of many ornamental grasses and can easily fulfill a similar role in the landscape. Harvest lemongrass for its bulbous stem bases, rich with lemony flavor, or clip leaves for infusing tea and soup stock. The oil is used as a pesticide and a preservative. Research shows that lemongrass oil has antifungal properties. Despite its ability to repel some insects, such as mosquitoes, its oil is commonly used as a “lure” to attract honey bees.

 The essential oil is stimulating, relaxing, soothing and balancing. The chemical composition of lemongrass essential oil varies according to the geographical origin; the compounds typically include hydrocarbon terpenes, alcohols, ketones, esters and mainly aldehydes. The essential consists of mainly citral at about 70 to 80 percent.

lemongrass

Lemongrass essential oil is a source of essential vitamins such as vitamin:

A

B1

B2

B3

B5

B6

folate

vitamin C

It also provides essential minerals such as:

magnesium

phosphorous

manganese

copper

potassium,

calcium

zinc

iron

Common Method of Extraction

Steam Distilled

Plant Part Typically Used

Grass

Color

Pale Yellow to Vivid Yellow

Consistency

Thin

Perfumery Note

Top

Strength of Aroma

Strong

Aromatic Description

Fresh, lemony, earthy.

Lemongrass Essential Oil Uses

  • Muscular Aches & Pains; as well as Headaches
  • Gastrointestinal Disorders
  • Indigestion
  • Helps Physical & Mental Exhaustion, Anxiety, & Depression by Boosting Self-esteem, Confidence, Hope, & Mental Strength
  • Inhibits Microbial & Fungal Growth has Antiseptic Properties; Helping Lower Fevers, Acne, Heal Wounds

  • Astringent
  • Helps Flatulence
  • Stimulates Urine & Lactation
  • Helps with Hairloss 
  • Insect Repellent
  • Sedative & Calming

Lemongrass is personally one of my favorite essential oils!

photo credit: Andrea_Nguyen Fresh lemongrass via photopin (license)

Essential Oil of the Month: Amyris (Torchwood) Calming to the Body and Mind!

Amyris: generic name is derived from the Greek word αμυρων (amyron), which means “intensely scented” and refers to the strong odor of the resin; it is also known as West Indian Sandalwood. Is known as a Torchwood because of the highly flammable wood.

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Sapindales
Family: Rutaceae
Subfamily: Toddalioideae
Genus: Amyris
P.Browne
Type species
Amyris balsamifera
L.

Is a type of balsam.

Blends well with:  masculine scents & Citronella, Geranium, Lavandin, Lavender, Nagarmotha, Oakmoss, Cedarwood, Patchouli, Sassafras, Sandalwood, Vetiver, & Ylang Ylang.

Used as a substitute for sandalwood, though scent profiles are different.

Note: base & fixative

Part used: wood

Steam distilled

Chakra: Sacral

Chakra color: orange

Scent profile: It has a hidden note of sweet dry earthy vanilla is similar to Benzoin Absolute, cedar (woody) with balsamic notes.

Used as: Antiseptic, deodorant, emollient, sedative, improves circulation. Very calming to the skin and the mind; considered an aphrodisiac.

Essential Oil should not be applied directly to the skin but in carrier oils, putting the oils directly on the skin is too harsh due to their concentrated form. Add a few drops essential oil to the carrier oil.

If you are pregnant, receiving cancer treatment, or have a weakened immune system the use of essential oils is not recommended!

While essential oil will not go rancid, carrier oils can. Store your carrier oils in a cool, dry, and dark place.

Disclaimer

While I’ve attempted to use credible sources for information, this is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment. If there is a disparity between the information presented within this blog and the advice given by your medical professional, please follow the medical professional’s advice as he/she will know you and your medical circumstances.

The Root Chakra: Your Survival Center!

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The root chakra “Muladhara” is the foundational support center for our entire chakra system; it is your connection to this world. Mula meaning “root” and Adhara, which means “support” or “base.”

First Chakra

It is a place of basic needs such as food, shelter, sex and safety. It is where we find smell, sexual desire, animal instinct, emotions, etc. The root chakra is a very physical chakra “your energy body” – a place where we connect to our physcial bodies and to the earth body…. a place that is powerfully effected by smell.

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It is important to stabilize this chakra.

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It is located at the base of the spine, and is related to the perineum, near the anus. Being associated with the sense of smell, it is associated with the nose.

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Are you grounded? Take this quiz!

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Healing Foods:

Red colored foods (apples and beets)
Hot spices (Red cayenne peppers and Tabasco sauce)
Vegetables from the ground (potatoes and carrots)

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Every chakra comes with a character and emotion. If you feel those emotions and feelings are getting stronger, it signifies that that the chakra is now in balance. You should always move from lower to upper chakras.

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Ingredient: What Is Fuller’s Earth?

A specific type of clay that got its name back in the days when a Fuller an old English name for a worker used the clay combining it with water, urine, and the cleansing herb soapwort (Saponaria officinalis) to extract grease and oil from woolen cloth.

Composition:

Hydrated aluminum silicates that contain metal ions such as magnesium, sodium, and calcium within their structure.

Minerals montmorillonite, kaolinite, attapulgite, & palygorskite in various ammounts
[Read more…]

Essential oil of the Month: Ylang Ylang – The Aphrodisiac!

C. odorata is a fast-growing tree of the custard-apple family Annonaceae. The flower is drooping, long-stalked, with six narrow, greenish-yellow (rarely pink) petals, rather like a sea star in appearance, and yields a highly fragrant essential oil. The name ylang-ylang is derived from Tagalog, either from the word ilang, meaning “wilderness”, alluding to its natural habitat, or the word ilang-ilan, meaning “rare”, suggestive of its exceptionally unique scent.It is native to the Philippines and Indonesia and is commonly grown in Polynesia, Melanesia, Micronesia and Comoros Islands.

Scent of ylang ylang: The fragrance is intensely sweet, heady, floral, and slightly spicy, with a narcissus or bananalike overtone.

The essential oil is used in aromatherapy. It is believed to relieve high blood pressure, normalize sebum secretion for skin problems, help you to sleep, and is considered to be an aphrodisiac. It is used to sharpen the senses and to temper depression, fear, anger, and jealousy. For Chakra work, Ylang Ylang Essential Oil is said to help balance the Sacral and Solar Plexus Chakras.  The oil from ylang-ylang is widely used in perfumery for oriental or floral themed perfumes (such as Chanel No. 5).

Ylang Ylang I, II and III:  Ylang Ylang Extra Oil is typically distilled from the flower  via steam for a short duration of time before the essential oil is collected. After oil classified as Ylang Ylang Extra is collected, the distillation process then continues. After a period of time, the distillation process is stopped and the resulting oil is then again collected. That oil is then referred to as Ylang Ylang I. The process repeats, resulting in Ylang Ylang II and Ylang Ylang III. The duration between distillations and the details can vary between distillers. The distillations are generally referred to as fractions and are typically used within fragrancing and perfumery applications.

Blends well with:  Bergamot, chamomile, clary sage, clove, eucalyptus lemon, ginger, grapefruit, jasmine, lemon, litsea cubeba, mandarin, neroli, opopanax, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, peru balsam, petitgrain, rose, rosewood, sandalwood, tuberose, vetiver

 

In Indonesia, ylang-ylang flowers are spread on the bed of newlywed couples. In the Philippines, its flowers, together with the flowers of the sampaguita, are strung into a necklace (lei) and worn by women and used to adorn religious images.

Ylang-ylang’s essential oil makes up 29% of the Comoros’ annual export (1998).

Ylang-ylang is a common flavoring in Madagascar for ice cream.

 

 

 

 

Essential Oil should not be applied directly to the skin but in carrier oils, putting the oils directly on the skin is too harsh due to their concentrated form. Add a few drops of Celery Seed essential oil to the carrier oil.

If you are pregnant, receiving cancer treatment,or have a weakened immune system the use of essential oils is not recommended!

While essential oil will not go rancid, carrier oils can. Store your carrier oils in a cool, dry, and dark place.

Disclaimer

While I’ve attempted to use credible sources for information, this is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment. If there is a disparity between the information presented within this blog and the advice given by your medical professional, please follow the medical professional’s advice as he/she will know you and your medical circumstances.

Essential Oil of the Month: Oregano!

Oregano (Origanum vulgare) is a common species of Origanum, a genus of the mint family (Lamiaceae). It is a perennial herb, it has a pH range between 6.0 (mildly acidic) and 9.0 (strongly alkaline) with a preferred range between 6.0 and 8.0. The flowers are purple spikes. It is sometimes called wild marjoram.

 

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Lamiales
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Origanum
Species: O. vulgare

Oregano is an important culinary herb, used for the flavour of its leaves, which can be more flavourful when dried than fresh. It has an aromatic, warm and slightly bitter taste, which can vary in intensity. Good quality oregano may be strong enough almost to numb the tongue. Among the chemical compounds contributing to the flavour are carvacrol, thymol, limonene, pinene, ocimene, and caryophyllene.

Hippocrates used oregano as an antiseptic, as well as a cure for stomach and respiratory ailments. A Cretan oregano (O. dictamnus) is still used today in Greece as a palliative for sore throat.

Oregano is high in antioxidant activity, due to a high content of phenolic acids and flavonoids.In test-tube studies, it also has shown antimicrobial against strains of the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and potential anti fungal activity.

In the traditional Austrian medicine Origanum vulgare herb has been used internally (as tea) or externally (as ointment) for treatment of disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tract, and nervous system.

It has strong immune-enhancing and antioxidant properties and supports the respiratory system. Oregano may also be used to enhance the flavor of food. Oregano is also a key oil used in the Raindrop Technique, a massage of essential oils, which is designed to bring about electrical alignment in the body.

Regulatory Status: GRAS 182.20.

Aromatherapy: Oregano essential oil is invigorating, purifying and uplifting.

Blends well with: Cedarwood, lavender, lavandin, rosemary, thyme, marjoram, spike lavender, pine, camphor, citronella.

Click here for a great article on The Benefits Oregano by the Huffington Post

 


 

Do not take the essential oil internally.

Essential Oil should not be applied directly to the skin but in carrier oils, putting the oils directly on the skin is too harsh due to their concentrated form. Add a few drops of essential oil to the carrier oil.

If you are pregnant, receiving cancer treatment, or have a weakened immune system the use of essential oils is not recommended!

While essential oil will not go rancid, carrier oils can. Store your carrier oils in a cool, dry, and dark place.

Disclaimer

While I’ve attempted to use credible sources for information, this is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment. If there is a disparity between the information presented within this blog and the advice given by your medical professional, please follow the medical professional’s advice as he/she will know you and your medical circumstances.

Essential Oil of the Month: Davana to Please Shiva!

Artemisia pallens, Dhavanam (Tamil: மரிக்கொழுந்து, தவணம், Marathi: दवणा), is an aromatic herb.  Seen mostly grown in India.  Davana is a preferred food for the larvae of a number of butterfly species.

Artemisia pallens
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Genus: Artemisia
Species: A. pallens
Binomial name
Artemisia pallens
Wall. ex DC.

Davana oil is used in making perfumes of sweet and fruity fragrances. When applied on the skin, Davana is said to smell differently on different people making it difficult to describe the scent. The feedback tends to alternate between masculine floral scents through to a woodsy, balsamic odor.

Note: Middle or Base

This peculiar property is highly valued in high class perfumery to create fragrances with truly individual notes. It has a very rich, penetrating, warm, uniquely herbaceous aroma. Davana is also used for fighting infections and calming anger.

Davana blossoms are offered to Shiva, the God of Transformation, by the faithful, and decorate his altar throughout the day.

 

 

Properties: Antiseptic, antiviral, aphrodisiac, disinfectant, emmenagogue, expectorant, nervine, sedative, vulnerary

Blends Well With: Amyris, bergamot, black pepper, cardamom, chamomile, jasmine, mandarin, neroli, orange, patchouli, rose, sandalwood, spikenard, tangerine, tuberose, vanilla, ylang ylang

 

Do not take the essential oil internally.

Essential Oil should not be applied directly to the skin but in carrier oils, putting the oils directly on the skin is too harsh due to their concentrated form. Add a few drops of essential oil to the carrier oil.

If you are pregnant, receiving cancer treatment, or have a weakened immune system the use of essential oils is not recommended!

While essential oil will not go rancid, carrier oils can. Store your carrier oils in a cool, dry, and dark place.

Disclaimer

While I’ve attempted to use credible sources for information, this is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment. If there is a disparity between the information presented within this blog and the advice given by your medical professional, please follow the medical professional’s advice as he/she will know you and your medical circumstances.

Essential Oil of the Month: Palmarosa!

Palmarosa (Cymbopogon martini) is a species of grass in the lemon grass genus  and is also related to and citronella it is best known by the common name palmarosa. Other common names include Indian geranium, Turkish geranium, gingergrass, rosha or rosha grass. Palmrosa grass occurs in two varieties, Motia or Palmarosa, and Sofia or Rusa. Originally from Central and North India, and now cultivated in Africa and Madagascar as well, the grass is slender, bearing panicles of a blue-white color which mature to a dark red. It has been distilled since the eighteenth century, especially in Turkey, to simulate or adulterate Turkish rose oil (which is very expensive).

The essential oil of this plant, which contains the active compound geraniol, a natural antiseptic and bactericide. It is valued for its scent and for a number of traditional medicinal and household uses. The plant is used in curry and meat dishes in India and West Africa, where its properties kill bacteria and help the digestion of fatty food.

Palmarosa can relieve the discomforts of flu, a high temperature, infection, and acne. It contains a small of antioxidants.

Do not take the essential oil internally.

Essential Oil should not be applied directly to the skin but in carrier oils, putting the oils directly on the skin is too harsh due to their concentrated form. Add a few drops of palmarosa essential oil to the carrier oil.

If you are pregnant, receiving cancer treatment, or have a weakened immune system the use of essential oils is not recommended!

While essential oil will not go rancid, carrier oils can. Store your carrier oils in a cool, dry, and dark place.

Disclaimer

While I’ve attempted to use credible sources for information, this is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment. If there is a disparity between the information presented within this blog and the advice given by your medical professional, please follow the medical professional’s advice as he/she will know you and your medical circumstances.

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Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils from Palmarosa, Evening Primrose, Lavender and Tuberose – M. H. Lodhia, K. R. Bhatt, and V. S. Thaker

Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Disease – Antioxidant activity of palmarosa essential oil (Cymbopogon martini) grown in north indian plains

 

My Must Haves For December!

SinEcch & SinEcchi

the Only Arnica Montana

Clinically Proven to Reduce

Bruising and Swelling After Surgery!

Omorovicza Copper Peel

WellnessFX

Customized blood tests and personalized

clinical advice to help you better

understand your health and provide

actionable ways to achieve optimal health.

Masque*ology
Advanced 7D Solution With 7-Dehydrocholesterol

MAKE UP FOR EVER
Aqua Rouge, 8 Iconic Red

Epsom Salts

Essential Oil of the Month: Hyssop – The Biblical Herb!

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Lamiales
Family: Lamiaceae
Subfamily: Nepetoideae
Tribe: Mentheae
Genus: Hyssopus L.
Species: H. officinalis
Binomial name
Hyssopus officinalis L.
Synonyms
Hyssopus decumbens

Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Flowering plant
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Sweet, rich herbaceous, camphoraceous
Largest Producing Countries: Spain, Hungary, and France

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis – Labiatae)

The name comes from the Greek, hyssopus, itself derived from the Hebrew ezob, meaning good scented herb. A hardy green bushy plant with narrow dark leaves similar to those of lavender and rosemary, it grows to around 30 – 60 cm (1-2 ft) in height. It originated in southern Europe and was introduced to Britain by the Romans (and then to America by early settlers). It grows wild in France in rocky soil and on old ruins; in Britain it is often found in garden borders or hedges, mixed with rosemary, catmint and lavender. Its beautiful flower tops are usually royal blue, but can be white or pink. The flowers are highly aromatic and attractive to bees and butterflies.

Hyssop, both flowers and leaves, has been highly valued since ancient times for its therapeutic properties, and was one of the bitter herbs mentioned in the Old Testament (used in the Passover ritual). Hippocrates, Galen and Dioscorides favoured its bechic and pectoral properties. In pagan religious ceremonies, hyssop was sprayed on worshippers to purify them. The Romans used it medicinally and culinarily, the latter both for protection against plague and for its aphrodisiac effect in conjunction with ginger,thyme and pepper. Thomas Tusser in 500 Points of Good Husbandry (1573) recommended hyssop as a strewing herb, and by the time of the great herbals of the Middle Ages, the herb was so well known that their writers felt no need to go into too much detail about it.

ITS USES

In Illness

Hyssop is pectoral, an expectorant, decongestant, stimulant, sudorific and is carminative. It is recommended for coughs, colds, ‘flu, bronchitis, asthma and chronic catarrh. The plant also includes the chemicals thujone and phenol, which give it antiseptic properties. Hyssop can also be used externally, and one of the recurring recommendations is as a poultice of young bruised leaves on a bruise, cut or wound. It has been also used in the formulation of eye drops and mouthwash. Herb hyssop has also been observed to stimulate the gastrointestinal system.

Other Uses

Hyssop is one of the ingredients of some eau de colognes, and it is also used in the making of absinthe and vermouth. It can be infused in the rinsing water for linen.

The plant is commonly used by beekeepers to produce a rich and aromatic honey.

Herb hyssop leaves are used as an aromatic condiment. The leaves have a lightly bitter taste due to its tannins, and an intense minty aroma. Due to its intensity, it is used moderately in cooking. The herb is also used to flavor liqueur, and is part of the official formulation of Chartreuse.

Benefits: Bruises, colds, cough, fatigue, fevers, flatulence, indigestion, inflammation, loss of appetite, nervous tension, sore throat, stress related conditions, wounds.

Blends Well With: Bay, clary sage, geranium, grapefruit, lavender, lemon, mandarin, myrtle, orange, rosemary, sage

Essential Oil should not be applied directly to the skin but in carrier oils, putting the oils directly on the skin is too harsh due to their concentrated form. Add a few drops of Hyssop essential oil to the carrier oil.

If you are pregnant, receiving cancer treatment,or have a weakened immune system the use of essential oils is not recommended!  Hyssop should be avoided if you are epileptic or have a seizure disorder! Never take an essential oil orally without consulting a medical professional.

While essential oil will not go rancid, carrier oils can. Store your carrier oils in a cool, dry, and dark place.


Disclaimer

While I’ve attempted to use credible sources for information, this is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment. If there is a disparity between the information presented within this blog and the advice given by your medical professional, please follow the medical professional’s advice as he/she will know you and your medical circumstances. These statements has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease.

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