Essential Oil of the Month: Lemongrass!

Essential oil of the month Lemongrass!

Cymbopogon, better known as lemongrass, is a genus of Asian, African, Australian, and tropical island plants (herb) in the grass family.  Lemongrass is widely used as a culinary herb in Asian cuisines prized for its strong citrus flavor with hints of mint and ginger it is also as a medicinal herb in India. In the garden, lemongrass forms a tall, grassy clump 3 to 5 feet tall. Its appearance rivals that of many ornamental grasses and can easily fulfill a similar role in the landscape. Harvest lemongrass for its bulbous stem bases, rich with lemony flavor, or clip leaves for infusing tea and soup stock. The oil is used as a pesticide and a preservative. Research shows that lemongrass oil has antifungal properties. Despite its ability to repel some insects, such as mosquitoes, its oil is commonly used as a “lure” to attract honey bees.

 The essential oil is stimulating, relaxing, soothing and balancing. The chemical composition of lemongrass essential oil varies according to the geographical origin; the compounds typically include hydrocarbon terpenes, alcohols, ketones, esters and mainly aldehydes. The essential consists of mainly citral at about 70 to 80 percent.

lemongrass

Lemongrass essential oil is a source of essential vitamins such as vitamin:

A

B1

B2

B3

B5

B6

folate

vitamin C

It also provides essential minerals such as:

magnesium

phosphorous

manganese

copper

potassium,

calcium

zinc

iron

Common Method of Extraction

Steam Distilled

Plant Part Typically Used

Grass

Color

Pale Yellow to Vivid Yellow

Consistency

Thin

Perfumery Note

Top

Strength of Aroma

Strong

Aromatic Description

Fresh, lemony, earthy.

Lemongrass Essential Oil Uses

  • Muscular Aches & Pains; as well as Headaches
  • Gastrointestinal Disorders
  • Indigestion
  • Helps Physical & Mental Exhaustion, Anxiety, & Depression by Boosting Self-esteem, Confidence, Hope, & Mental Strength
  • Inhibits Microbial & Fungal Growth has Antiseptic Properties; Helping Lower Fevers, Acne, Heal Wounds

  • Astringent
  • Helps Flatulence
  • Stimulates Urine & Lactation
  • Helps with Hairloss 
  • Insect Repellent
  • Sedative & Calming

Lemongrass is personally one of my favorite essential oils!

photo credit: Andrea_Nguyen Fresh lemongrass via photopin (license)

Essential Oil of the Month: Spicy Carnation!

Carnations were mentioned in Greek literature 2,000 years ago. “Dianthus” was coined by Greek botanist Theophrastus, and is derived from the Greek words for divine (“dios”) and flower (“anthos”). Some scholars believe that the name “carnation” comes from “coronation” or “corone” (flower garlands), as it was one of the flowers used in Greek ceremonial crowns. Others think the name stems from the Latin “caro” (genitive “carnis”) (flesh), which refers to the original colour of the flower, or incarnatio (incarnation), which refers to the incarnation of God made flesh. The legend that explains the name is that Diana the Goddess came upon the shepherd boy and took a liking to him. But the boy, for some reason, turned her down. Diana ripped out his eyes and threw them to the ground where they sprouted into the Dianthus flower.

Although originally applied to the species Dianthus caryophyllus, the name Carnation is also often applied to some of the other species of Dianthus, and more particularly to garden hybrids between D. caryophyllus and other species in the genus.

Botanical Name: Dianthus caryophyllus
Origin: Egypt
Process: Solvent Extracted Absolute
Plant Part: Flowers
Cultivation: Cultivated
Use: Natural Perfumery
Note: Middle note
Aroma: Spicy (clove-like), honey, floral with strong green notes

Blends well with:  Clary Sage, Coriander, Clove, Grapefruit, Jasmine, Jonquille, Lavender, Patchouli and Ylang Ylang

Uses:  Promotes healing of body and mind, happiness and well-being, decreased anxiety, increased sensuality, decreased irritation, a lifting of depression and apathy. Aids in digestion, calms muscle spasms, lymphatic cleansing, reduces growth of diseased cells, promotes kidney, prostate and bladder health. Helps enhances self worth, strength, and protection.

Symbolism and Events

  • For the most part, carnations express love, fascination, and distinction, though there are many variations dependent on color.
  • Along with the red rose, the red carnation can be used as a symbol of socialism and the labour movement, and historically has often been used in demonstrations on International Workers’ Day (May Day).
  • In Portugal, bright red carnations represent the 1974 coup d’etat started by the military to end the fascist regime ongoing since 1926.
  • Light red carnations represent admiration, while dark red denote deep love and affection.
  • White carnations represent pure love and good luck, while striped (variegated) carnations symbolise regret that a love cannot be shared.
  • White carnations, in the Netherlands are associated with HRH prince Bernhard. He wore one during WWII and in a gesture of defiance some of the Dutch population took up this gesture. After the war the white carnation became a sign of the Prince, veterans and remembrance of the resistance.
  • Purple carnations indicate capriciousness. In France, it is a traditional funeral flower, given in condolence for the death of a loved one.
  • In France and Francophone cultures, carnations symbolize misfortune and bad luck.
  • Pink carnations have the most symbolic and historical significance: According to a Christian legend, carnations first appeared on Earth as Jesus carried the Cross. The Virgin Mary shed tears at Jesus’ plight, and carnations sprang up from where her tears fell. Thus the pink carnation became the symbol of a mother’s undying love.
  • Carnation is the birth flower for those born in the month of January.
  • The formal name for carnation, dianthus, comes from Greek for “heavenly flower”, or the flower of Jove.
  • Carnations are often worn on special occasions, especially Mother’s Day and weddings. In 1907, Anna Jarvis chose a carnation as the emblem of Mother’s Day because it was her mother’s favourite flower. This tradition is now observed in the United States and Canada on the second Sunday in May. Ann Jarvis chose the white carnation because she wanted to represent the purity of a mother’s love. This meaning has evolved over time, and now a red carnation may be worn if one’s mother is alive, and a white one if she has died.
  • In Korea, carnations express admiration, love and gratitude. Red and pink carnations are worn on Parents Day (Korea does not separate Mother’s Day or Father’s Day, but has Parents Day on 8 May). Sometimes, parents wear a corsage of carnation(s) on their left chest on Parents Day. Carnations are also worn on Teachers Day (15 May).
  • Red carnations are worn on May Day as a symbol of socialism and the labour movement in some countries, such as Austria, Italy, and successor countries of the former Yugoslavia. The red carnation is also the symbol of the Portuguese Carnation Revolution.
  • Green carnations are for St. Patrick’s Day and were famously worn by the Irish writer Oscar Wilde. The green carnation thence became a symbol of homosexuality in the early 20th century, especially through the book The Green Carnation and Noël Coward’s song, “We All Wear a Green Carnation” in his operetta, Bitter Sweet.
  • In Poland, in times of People’s Republic of Poland, carnations were traditionally given to women on the widely celebrated Women’s Day, together with commodities that were difficult to obtain due to the economic hardships faced by the country’s communist system, such as tights, towels, soap and coffee.
  • At the University of Oxford, carnations are traditionally worn to all examinations; white for the first exam, pink for exams in between, and red for the last exam. One story explaining this tradition relates that initially a white carnation was kept in a red inkpot between exams, so by the last exam it was fully red; the story is thought to originate in the late 1990s.
  • Carnations are the traditional first wedding anniversary flower.
  • Carnation is the national flower of Spain, Monaco, and Slovenia, and the provincial flower of the autonomous community of the Balearic Islands. The state flower of Ohio is a scarlet carnation, which was introduced to the state by Levi L. Lamborn. The choice was made to honor William McKinley, Ohio Governor and U.S. President, who was assassinated in 1901, and regularly wore a scarlet carnation on his lapel.


If you are pregnant, receiving cancer treatment, or have a weakened immune system the use of essential oils is not recommended!
While essential oil will not go rancid, carrier oils can. Store your carrier oils in a cool, dry, and dark place.
Disclaimer
While I’ve attempted to use credible sources for information, this is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment. If there is a disparity between the information presented within this blog and the advice given by your medical professional, please follow the medical professional’s advice as he/she will know you and your medical circumstances.

Essential Oil of the Month: Distinctive Juniper!

Juniper has a clean, mildly penetrating, woody scent that has a cleansing effect on the mind, spirit, and body. It may work as a detoxifier and cleanser, is beneficial to the skin, and supportive to the urinary system

Scientific classification

Kingdom: Plantae

Division: Pinophyta

Class: Pinopsida

Order: Pinales

Family: Cupressaceae

Genus: Juniperus
  

PARTS USED: Berries

EXTRACTION METHOD: Steam distilled

NOTE CLASSIFICATION: Middle

AROMA : Fresh, green, fruity, balsamic undertone


BLENDS WELL WITHBlack pepper, cedarwood, clary sage, cypress, elemi, fir needle, lavender, oakmoss, rosemary

Juniper berries are a spice used in a wide variety of culinary dishes and best known for the primary flavoring in gin (and responsible for gin’s name, which is a shortening of the Dutch word for juniper, genever). Juniper berries are also used as the primary flavor in the liquor Jenever and sahti-style of beers. Juniper berry sauce is often a popular flavoring choice for quail, pheasant, veal, rabbit, venison and other meat dishes.

Don’t confuse juniper berry oil with cade oil, which is distilled from juniper wood (Juniperus oxycedrus).

 
 

Many of the earliest prehistoric people lived in or near juniper forests which furnished them food, fuel, and wood for shelter or utensils. Many species, such as J. chinensis (Chinese Juniper) from eastern Asia, are extensively used in landscaping and horticulture, and as one of the most popular species for use in bonsai. It is also a symbol of longevity, strength, athleticism, and fertility.

Some junipers are susceptible to Gymnosporangium rust disease, and can be a serious problem for those people growing apple trees, the alternate host of the disease.

Some junipers are given the common name “cedar,” including Juniperus virginiana, the “red cedar” that is used widely in cedar drawers. “Eastern redcedar” is the correct name for J. virginiana. The lack of space between the words “red” and “cedar” indicate that this species is not a true cedar, Cedrus.

In Morocco, the tar (gitran) of the arar tree (Juniperus phoenicea) is applied in dotted patterns on bisque drinking cups. Gitran makes the water more fragrant and is said to be good for the teeth.

Some Indigenous peoples, such as the Dineh, have traditionally used juniper to treat diabetes. Animal studies have shown that treatment with juniper may retard the development of streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice. Native Americans have also used juniper berries as a female contraceptive. The 17th Century herbalist physician Nicholas Culpeper recommended the ripened berries for conditions such as asthma and sciatica, as well as to speed childbirth.

Juniper is one of the plants used in Scottish and Gaelic Polytheist saining rites, such as those performed at Hogmanay (New Year), where the smoke of burning juniper is used to cleanse, bless and protect the household and its inhabitants.
Juniper berries are steam distilled to produce an essential oil that may vary from colorless to yellow or pale green. Some of its chemical components are alpha pinene, cadinene, camphene and terpineol. Leaves and twigs of Juniperus virginiana are steam distilled to produce oil of juniper. Middle Tennessee and adjacent northern Alabama and southern Kentucky are the centers for this activity. The U.S. Forest Service has provided plans for the apparatus required. This work is typically done during periods of cold weather to reduce the loss of essential oil to evaporation, which is greater in warmer weather, and to take advantage of a time of year when labor might be more readily available. 

 Juniper in weave is a traditional cladding technique used in Northern Europe, e.g. at Havrå, Norway.

  

Juniper is used for digestion problems including upset stomach, intestinal gas (flatulence), heartburn, bloating, and loss of appetite, as well as gastrointestinal (GI) infections and intestinal worms. It is also used for urinary tract infections (UTIs) and kidney and bladder stones. Other uses include treating snakebite, diabetes, and cancer.

Some people apply juniper directly to the skin for wounds and for pain in joints and muscles. The essential oil of juniper is inhaled to treat bronchitis and numb pain.

In foods, the juniper berry is often used as a condiment and a flavoring ingredient in gin and bitter preparations. The extract and essential oil are used as a flavoring ingredient in foods and beverages.

In manufacturing, the juniper oil is used as a fragrance in soaps and cosmetics.

Juniper extract and juniper oil are used in cosmetics including lipstick, foundation, hair conditioners, bath oils, bubble bath, eye shadow, and many other products.
In drier areas, juniper pollen easily becomes airborne and can be inhaled into the lungs. This pollen can also irritate the skin and cause contact dermatitis. Cross-allergenic reactions are common between juniper pollen and the pollen of all species of cypress.

Monoecious juniper plants are highly allergenic, with an OPALS allergy scale rating of 9 out of 10. Completely male juniper plants have an OPALS rating of 10, and release abundant amounts of pollen. Conversely, all-female juniper plants have an OPALS rating of 1, and are considered “allergy-fighting”.
Essential Oil should not be applied directly to the skin but in carrier oils, putting the oils directly on the skin is too harsh due to their concentrated form. Add a few drops essential oil to the carrier oil.

Avoid in kidney or liver disease!

If you are pregnant, receiving cancer treatment, or have a weakened immune system the use of essential oils is not recommended!
While essential oil will not go rancid, carrier oils can. Store your carrier oils in a cool, dry, and dark place.
Disclaimer

While I’ve attempted to use credible sources for information, this is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment. If there is a disparity between the information presented within this blog and the advice given by your medical professional, please follow the medical professional’s advice as he/she will know you and your medical circumstances.

Charcoal: Why Use This Onyx Skin Savior!

Charcoal this messy wonder is to many of us is associated with many things: art, cooking, camping, fireplaces, fuel, and trains. However charcoal is also used for purification and skincare.  I know not the first thing you would to put on your face when there are much more glamorous ingredients out there to use.
 
Why bother?
 
Black Charcoal
Activated Charcoal
White Charcoal
 

 

Origins Clear Improvement™ Active Charcoal Mask To Clear Pores
 
 

 

Charcoal may be activated to increase its effectiveness as a filter. Activated charcoal readily adsorbs a wide range of organic compounds dissolved or suspended in gases and liquids. Activated carbon is used in water purification, medicine, and air filters. It is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines. Because of its natural detoxifying properties, it can be used to whiten teeth, remove poisons from your body, and cleanse!
 
 
 
Charcoal is a clear winner for absorbing oil and debris from pores on your face and body.
 
It is known to absorb 100 to 200 times its weight in impurities.
 
There isn’t a lot of clinical data for the use of charcoal on the skin, its been used for thousands of years and from my own personal use on my skin only I find it to be effective. See a medical professional if you want to take charcoal internally. (see data below)
 
Origins Skin Diver Active Charcoal Body Wash

 

Boscia Konjac Cleansing Sponge with Bamboo Charcoal
 
Lush You Snap the Whip Body Butter
 
GlamGlow YouthMud Tinglexfoliate Treatment Mask
 
Bioré Deep Pore Charcoal Cleanser
 

Essential Oil Of The Month: Lime

Lime (from Arabic and French lim) is a citrus fruit

Some species of limes are: Key lime, Persian lime, kaffir lime, and desert lime.

Limes are a good source of vitamin C, and are often used to accent the flavors of foods and beverages. Limes were first grown in southern Iraq and Persia.

Kaffir Limes

The pleasant citrus aroma of lime may help mental clarity, anxiety, and encourage creativity.

 

In India, the lime is used in Tantra for removing evil spirits. It is also combined with Indian chillies to make a protective charm to repel the evil eye. Furthermore, it was believed that hanging limes over sick people cured them of the illness by repelling evil spirits lurking inside the body.

 

 

When human skin is exposed to ultraviolet light after lime juice contact, a reaction known as phytophotodermatitis can occur, which can cause darkening of the skin, swelling or blistering. Bartenders and others in the food industry that handle limes and other citrus fruits on a regular basis may develop phytophotodermatitis due to the high concentration of furocoumarins in limes; the main furanocoumarin in limes is lemittin.

 

Lime essential oil can help prevent and heal infections, as it is an antiseptic, antiviral, astringent, bactericidal, and disinfectant. Helps acneic skin.

Blends Well With:  Clary Sage, Lavender, Neroli, Lemon, Lemongrass, Letiver, Orange, Basil, Jasmin, Geranium, Nutmeg, Rosemary, Vanilla, Citronella, and Ylang-Ylang.

 

FYI

The tree known in Britain as the lime tree (Tilia sp.), called the linden in other dialects of English, is a broadleaf temperate plant unrelated to the Citrus fruits.

 

Do not take the essential oil internally.

Essential Oil should not be applied directly to the skin but in carrier oils, putting the oils directly on the skin is too harsh due to their concentrated form. Add a few drops of essential oil to the carrier oil.

If you are pregnant, receiving cancer treatment, or have a weakened immune system the use of essential oils is not recommended!

While essential oil will not go rancid, carrier oils can. Store your carrier oils in a cool, dry, and dark place.

Disclaimer

While I’ve attempted to use credible sources for information, this is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment. If there is a disparity between the information presented within this blog and the advice given by your medical professional, please follow the medical professional’s advice as he/she will know you and your medical circumstances.

Juniper Essential Oil of the Month! Gin & Tonic Anyone?

Juniper – (Juniperus osteosperma and scopulorum)

There are between 50 and 67 species of juniper, widely distributed throughout the northern hemisphere, from the Arctic, south to tropical Africa in the Old World, and to the mountains of Central America they are  part of the cypress family

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Pinophyta
Class: Pinopsida
Order: Pinales
Family: Cupressaceae
Genus: Juniperus

Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled

Parts Used: Berries

Note Classification: Middle

Aroma: Fresh, green, fruity, balsamic underton

Largest Producing Countries: Bulgaria, France, and Nepal

Traditional Use: Juniper has been used to purify the air, and as an insect repellant.

Properties: Analgesic, antimicrobial, antiputrefactive, antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, digestive, diuretic, sedative, stomachic

Blends Well With: Black pepper, cedarwood, clary sage, cypress, elemi, fir needle, lavender, oakmoss, rosemary

Juniper berries are a spice used in a wide variety of culinary dishes and best known for the primary flavoring in gin (and responsible for gin’s name, which is a shortening of the Dutch word for juniper, genever). Juniper berries are also used as the primary flavor in the liquor Jenever and sahti-style of beers and some times sauerkraut. Juniper berry sauce is often a popular flavoring choice for quail, pheasant, veal, rabbit, venison and other meat dishes. It is also a symbol of longevity, strength, athleticism, and fertility. American Indians, such as the Navajo, have traditionally used juniper to treat diabetes.

Juniper berries are steam distilled to produce an essential oil that may vary from colorless to yellow or pale green. Some of its chemical components are alpha pinene, cadinene, camphene and terpineol. Leaves and twigs of Juniperus virginiana are steam distilled to produce oil of juniper.

Juniper  has a clean, mildly penetrating, woody scent that has a cleansing effect on the mind, spirit, and body. It may work as a detoxifier and cleanser, is beneficial to the skin, and supportive to the urinary system.

Do not take the essential oil internally.

Essential Oil should not be applied directly to the skin but in carrier oils, putting the oils directly on the skin is too harsh due to their concentrated form. Add a few drops of juniper essential oil to the carrier oil.

If you are pregnant, receiving cancer treatment, or have a weakened immune system the use of essential oils is not recommended!

While essential oil will not go rancid, carrier oils can. Store your carrier oils in a cool, dry, and dark place.

Disclaimer

While I’ve attempted to use credible sources for information, this is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment. If there is a disparity between the information presented within this blog and the advice given by your medical professional, please follow the medical professional’s advice as he/she will know you and your medical circumstances.

My Must Haves For September!

Revision Skin Care Nectifirm

To keep your neck &
decollette youthful!

Decollette Pads or buy Silicon Scar Pads

Prevent and correct chest wrinkles
that are caused by sun damage,
aging, and gravity. Our reusable,
adhesive silicone pads are discreet
enough to wear under clothing, 
allowing you to smooth existing 
lines and wrinkles during the day
or to prevent new creases from
forming as you sleep. Apply the
self-adhesive pads while sleeping
or for 20-60 minutes during the
day to restore the décolletage area
Lightly apply your skin care
moisturizer, etc. then apply the pad.

Smile’s PRID Homeopathic Drawing Salve

Draws out splinters, boils, some cysts, even acne;
it smells but it works!

Squip Himalayan Sea Salt Inhaler

Read my article on:
Salt Cave Salt Therapy Salt Speleotherapy/Halotherapy!
Yes or No?

Self Facial Massage Part 3: Chinese Facial Massage!

Part 1

Part 2

Its beautifying benefits are staring you in the face. But can you do facial massage on yourself? Celebrity facialist, Su-Man, who has a pioneering treatment which fuses skincare application with a facial workout technique influenced by shiatsu, Pilates and oriental facial massage, tells us how.

She recommends each massage stroke is repeated 36 times in accordance to the ancient Chinese belief that the number six is lucky and helps lead the individual to a perfect state of health and happiness. And, it seems, chiselled cheekbones!

Follow this sequence of massages/gestures after cleansing your face. Usually morning or night-time. Make sure you touch your face/eyes/ears with clean hands. In ancient Chinese medicine all the pressure points on the face are not only related to internal organs but are also related to beauty. They make the face radiate, take away dullness and enhance your physical presence. Before you begin your daily self–facial you need to generate heat in the face, stimulating circulation therefore preparing the pressure points for massage. This is done by rubbing the ears with the palm of both hands until heat is generated in the ears. All the exercises are easier to do sitting down.

1) With the elbows rested on a table massage the face with moisturizer starting from the chin with the heels of both palms round up to the base of the ear line 36 times.

2) Take the heels of both your hands from the edge of your nostrils and press along in one continuous line underneath the cheekbones up to the edge of your ears. Again, 36 times and always, in one direction. Never press downwards. You want to lift the face muscles up – not down!!

3) Take the middle fingers of both hands and press the area between your eyes and your nose, at the very top of your nose. You stroke gently but firmly downwards following the nose line to the side of your nostrils. It is like drawing two lines in a downward direction. You do this 36 times. This also clears the sinuses and helps to improve your breathing.

4) You make two small claws with your four fingers of each hand. Put them together on the middle of your forehead and press quite firmly (without pulling the skin) in an outward direction, smoothly, until the temples. 36 times and again, only in one direction.

5) Tap around the eye sockets with our fingertips with the natural weight of the fingers. Do not tap too hard!! Six times above the eye socket and six times below. This stimulates the bones of the eye socket. Do not tap the eyelids!! They are too delicate and can damage the eyes. This exercise brightens the eyes and reduces any puffiness or swelling above or below the eyes. Once a day is enough. To finish off this exercise you continue tapping all over the face. But you only need to do this a few times.

6) Finally, after finishing all the above five exercises you take the fingertips of the two hands, and tap everywhere on the scalp and cranium quiet strongly (using the natural weight of your fingers) to wake up the energy, the blood circulation, and to strengthen the bones. Please note it is not good to touch your face after this exercise as you can transfer dust and dirt from your hair.

When you have finished this sequence I suggest you drink a glass of warm water to help the chi flow. Once a week I recommend that you exfoliate and put a mask on your face.”

It’s the ultimate anti-ageing technique; toning your facial muscles, lifting slack skin and reducing puffiness. What are you waiting for?

Self Facial Massage: Part 2! Japanese Facial Massage!

Part 1

When someone with a flawless complexion gives you skin-care advice, you listen. When that person is a model and the secret to her enviable visage is something that any mere mortal can do, you take detailed, copious notes.

A few months back, we asked four top models to share their beauty secrets, and more than one of the girls mentioned facial massage as something they swear by. A few weeks later, Hilary Rhoda also dropped the massage bomb, telling us it was the best beauty trick she had ever picked up backstage. Ever. Right then and there we vowed to add facial massage into our lives. The only problem: We hadn’t a clue as to what it was or how to do it.

Enter Diane Nakauchi, CEO of Japanese beauty brand Koh Gen Do and a registered nurse licensed in facial massage. “Facial massage in Japan came from the ancient, traditional anma, which literally means ‘to press and stroke,'” she says.

According to Nakauchi, facial massage improves the overall health of the skin, increases the lymph and blood flow, and removes toxins and dead skin cells. “The numerous benefits associated with facial massage include increased facial muscle tone; wrinkle reduction; a brighter, more even complexion; reduction of fluids and puffiness; softer skin and increased skin cell renewal. This all adds up to the ‘glow.'”

Best of all, facial massage is something that you (yes you!) can do to yourself for immediate, noticeable results. Ahead, you’ll find Nakauchi’s step-by-step instructions, plus detailed diagrams that will help you master the fine art of facial massage. Turns out, glowing, toned, model-worthy skin is just a few hand movements away.

Illustrations by

Step 1: Ffacial massage is best paired with a milky face lotion — you apply a layer to the surface of the skin before you begin the hand work. This will help your palms glide over the surface of your face, and as you go through the motions, the moisturizer will absorb into your skin.  Once the moisturizer has been lightly applied on the skin, place the palm of your hand to your forehead.

Step 2: Apply an even pressure and release the tension in your forehead by moving your palm in a circular motion.

Step 3: After 10 seconds of applying pressure, slowly move your palms up towards your temples.

Step 4: Place your palms to your temples and massage lightly. Repeat 2-3 times, or more if you are extremely tense.

Step 5: Place your palms underneath your cheekbones and move toward your ears. Lightly apply pressure as your palms move outward to relax tension.

Step 6: Place your thumb underneath your jaw, and your index finger by your nose.

Step 7: Move your entire hand slightly upward and outward, toward your ears.

Step 8: Move your hands from behind your ears down to your décolleté. Repeat 5-6 times.

by ,
 Via Refinery29

Also by CT Esthetic:

Lymph Self Massage

Facial Exercises

Scraping Massage -CHINESE GUASHA FACIAL MASSAGE

Benefits of Lymphatic Massage

Benefits of Facial Massage

Dry Brushing Benefits

Mudras: Yoga for the Hands!

Self Shiatsu Facial Massage Techniques!

Geisha were famous for their beautiful facial skin.The secret of their wrinkle free skin even in advanced age was the famous Shiastu Technique. Geisha did the SHIATSU Facial Massage daily, which helped them to always look young and attractive. The massage is done with light touches of your own fingertips. I do not think that Geisha were less busy than we are, but they always find time for it. It is much easier to spend five minutes every day to take care of yourself and try to keep your skin young and beautiful than to spend big money on creams, serums or plastic surgery.

 

Try the below tips to get Geisha like skin :

1. Find the point on the temples which gives you slight pain when you press on them. Use your fingertips to massage in circular motion from the nostrils to these
points around the temple. Repeat it three times.

2.Close your eyes and press lightly with your fingertips for three seconds on the inner corner of the eye. Repeat this movement three times.It will make your eyes
shiny.

3.Your neck can give away your age and hence require constant care.Use flip side of your palm to massage the neck from the middle of its side towards up.

4.Press the middle and index finger of both hands. Start your massage from the middle of your forehead and move towards your temples.This will make your forehead skin
very smooth.

5.Massage the corners of your mouth for one minute.Start below the middle of lower lip and slowly move towards the outer corner of the lips.This will keep your lips
wrinkle free.

6.Apply a suitable cream on fingertips of both the hands.Now massage your cheeks in the circular motion with your finger tips.It will keep your skin fresh and will
radiate energy.


Now look for below points on your face,forehead and neck :

  • ST6 bone pit below the jaw joint .
  • ST3 Located on the zygomatic bones on either side of the nose
  • ST9 recesses on the sides of the larynx
  • BL1 inner corner of the eye
  • BL2 indentation on the top edge of the orbital cavity
  • LI20 on the outside of the nose wings

All these points are paired. To look for them trust your instincts!Stand in front of a mirror and simulate all the points one by one.

Note : Avoid ST9 if you have a disease of the thyroid gland.

Via Bye Bye Doc

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