Jessica Rabbit, “I’m not bad, I’m just drawn that way!” Make Up Tutorial!

Jessica Rabbit

Jessica Rabbit (Photo credit: San Diego Shooter)

In 2008, Jessica Rabbit was selected by Empire Magazine as one of The 100 Greatest Movie Characters of All Time. In March, 2009, a UK newspaper voted Jessica Rabbit the sexiest cartoon character of all time, with Betty Boop in second place and the Cadbury’s Caramel Bunny in third.

Jessica Rabbit

Jessica Rabbit (Photo credit: auntie rain)

Jessica Rabbit is Roger’s human Toon wife in Who Framed Roger Rabbit. Jessica is one of the most famous sex symbols on the animated screen. Inspirations are from Hollywood “screen goddesses” Veronica Lake, noted for her famous “Peek-A-Boo” hairstyle, Lauren Bacall, and Rita Hayworth in Gilda (1946). She claims to Eddie Valiant, “I’m not bad, I’m just drawn that way,” which has become a popular quote. Writer Gary K. Wolf had based Jessica primarily on the cartoon character Red of Tex Avery‘s Red Hot Riding Hood.

Pin-up photo of Lauren Bacall for the November...

Pin-up photo of Lauren Bacall for the November 24/26, 1944 issue of Yank, the Army Weekly, a weekly U.S. Army magazine fully staffed by enlisted men. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Screenshot of Rita Hayworth as Gilda ...

English: Screenshot of Rita Hayworth as Gilda in the trailer for the film Gilda (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Veronica Lake

Veronica Lake (Photo credit: twm1340)

In the book, she was an immoral, up-and-coming star and former comic character over whom her estranged husband (comic strip star Roger Rabbit) became obsessed. She is re-imagined in the film as a sultry, but moral, cartoon singer at a Los Angeles supper club called The Ink and Paint Club. She is one of several suspects in the framing of her husband, who is a famous cartoon star. She is voiced by Kathleen Turner. Amy Irving was cast to sing “Why Don’t You Do Right?” (a blues song made famous by Peggy Lee) for Jessica’s first scene in the movie. According to animation director Richard Williams, other than being a really hot female human toon temptress, she deeply loves her husband Roger. She even calls him her honey-bunny and darling. She claims that he makes her laugh, is a better lover than a fighter and that he makes a more fitting husband than Goofy. As proof of her love she tells Eddie that she’ll pay any price for Roger and she even helps prove him innoccent by helping in the investigation.

Even though she’s a human toon, she is shown to have a few of the comedic cartoon antics typical of other toons. One such example was her cleavage having a hammerspace ability as one of the weasels searched her (with obvious perverted intent) for Marvin Acme’s last will and testament, only to comically get his hand caught in a bear trap and Valiant commenting on the event with a pun (“Nice booby trap”).

Jessica Rabbit

Jessica Rabbit (Photo credit: San Diego Shooter)

Another could be her restrained “wild take” (as she shouts, “Oh, my God, It’s DIP!”) seeing Judge Doom’s scheme involving the Dip, while a subtle effect was added by animator Russell Hall: The bounce of Jessica’s bosom was reversed from that of a real woman so that it would bounce up when a real woman’s breasts bounce down and vice versa. Furthermore when she blows kisses (as seen to Eddie in one scene) the lip-kisses are also done in a cartoonish style.

Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

7 Beauty Lessons You SHOULDN’T Follow From Old Hollywood

Via Stylelist   Posted: 01/11/12 01:39 PM ET  |  Updated: 01/13/12 03:38 PM ET

7 Beauty Lessons You SHOULDN’T Follow From Hollywood’s Golden Age

These days images of an overly-altered Heidi Montag or Britney Spears with her unfortunate extensions are scary reminders of the drastic (and not always pretty) lengths celebrities will go to achieve their own and society’s ideals of beauty. This has been going on for decades in Hollywood, even the most stunning of actresses from the ’30s, ’40s and ’50s were implementing their own bizarro beauty techniques to hide personal insecurities.

Did you know that Rita Hayworth felt so uncomfortable about her low hairline she had it raised, then dyed her black hair that famous shade of red? Elsewhere, both Elizabeth Taylor and Marilyn Monroe shaved their faces to get rid of unwanted peach fuzz. And Marlene Dietrich apparently had her upper molars removed to create shadows underneath her cheekbones, which looked even more dramatic with the contrast of the black and white film of the time. Admittedly, I’ve made my share of questionable beauty decisions: I nearly burned my face off with a shall-not-be-mentioned face exfoliant, all in the name of luminous skin. This subsequently seemed counter-productive since I walked around with my hand over my face for the next five days.

Herewith, a round-up of the some of the more alarming beauty tricks favored by the women of Hollywood’s Golden Age:

UPDATE: A previous version of this post stated incorrectly that Marilyn Monroe grew hair on her face due to a side-effect from a hormonal cream.

Marlene Dietrich:  She was rumored to have had her molars removed to give her cheekbones a more pronounced look. The German-born actress also had hairstylists pull her hair back tightly with hair pins and surgical tape, so her face would have a more taut, “face lift” effect.

Carole Lombard:  The wife of Clark Gable was so self-conscious of a crook in her nose that she drew a thin white line down it before she applied makeup, she believed this created the illusion of a straight nose.

Vivien Leigh:  The British actress had a thin lower lip, which she penciled over her natural lipline and filled in with lipstick.

Claudette Colbert:  The French-born actress was so embarrassed by her uneven face, she refused to ever be shot by the right side. Sounds like Mariah Carey took a page out of Colbert’s book.

Elizabeth Taylor:  She was born with hypertrichosis, an excessive body hair condition. She was covered with dark hair all over her body, including her ears and nose. Though it eventually fell off, the actress was known to shave her face to create a smooth, hairless effect.

Rita Hayworth: The flame-haired actress, who was actually born with black hair, had her hairline raised a full inch with electrolysis. Also, her hair grew so quickly that she had to dye it every three days to conceal her dark roots.

Marilyn Monroe:  In an effort to get glowy skin and remove unwanted peach fuzz, Monroe was known to shave her face.

Beauty of the Month!

Rita Hayworth!

Rita Hayworth

Yes, a natural beauty before such things as photo shop.

Fun fact Rita had her hairline raised with electrolysis, she was very self conscious about her low hair line!

Facebook
Twitter
More...

%d bloggers like this: