Why Sunscreen Prevents Photoaging!

Woman With Sunscream
Remember all those times we told you to wear sunscreen every single day to prevent aging? We have even more research showing that you should slather up often. A recent study done in Australia has confirmed what studies on mice and dermatologists have been saying for years: Using sunscreen daily stops photoaging. And here’s a spoiler: If you’re using sunscreen, but not using it daily and reapplying after a few hours or after swimming or heavy sweating, you’re doing your skin a disservice. The best effects are seen with those who use sunscreen every single day and reapply often.

The Study: Daily Sunscreen vs. Discretionary Use

This study demonstrates that applying sunscreen every day is more effective than applying it only when it seems appropriate.The study had 900 white participants who were younger than 55-years-old. One group was randomly assigned to apply a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or more to their head, neck, arms, and hands in the morning after washing, after spending several hours outside, or after sweating heavily. Another group was asked to use sunscreen at their discretion. Across both groups participants were also randomly assigned either 30 mg beta-carotene or a placebo pill (Annals of International Medicine). This amounted to four groups: regular sunscreen use with beta-carotene, regular sunscreen use with a placebo, discretionary sunscreen use with beta-carotene, and discretionary use with a placebo. The study took place between 1992 and 1996, and lasted a total of four-and-a-half years. Researchers took impressions of the participants’ skin at the beginning and end of the study, and had these impressions assessed by researchers who were not aware of who was using sunscreen or taking beta-carotene. These assessors gave a score from 0 to 6, with 0 being smooth, elastic skin with absolutely no photoaging, and 6 being wrinkled, inelastic skin with severe photoaging.

The Results: Daily Sunscreen Can Prevent Photoaging!

Those who used sunscreen every day with frequent reapplications looked younger after 4.5 years than those who used sunscreen at their discretion.

Those who used sunscreen every day with frequent reapplications looked younger after 4.5 years than those who used sunscreen at their discretion.

In the beginning, both groups had a median of 4. By the end of the study, the group who used sunscreen every day still had a median of 4, while a group who used sunscreen at their discretion had a median of 5. The group using sunscreen daily had 24% less aging than the group using sunscreen at their discretion. Researchers saw no difference between the beta-carotene supplement and placebo groups. And it’s worthwhile to note that neither group had bad habits in the sun, notes Dr. Barbara A. Gilchrist, dermatology professor at the Boston University School of Medicine and editor of The Journal of Investigative Dermatology, in this New York Times article. This merely illustrates the difference between groups who use sunscreen every single day, and those who use it at their discretion — but all of them use sunscreen. Some of the studies limitations were that about one-third of participants did not have molds taken at the beginning and end, the study did not investigate the effects on individuals over 55-years-old, and the study only looked at the effects of daily or discretionary sunscreen use light-skinned people, and the study was too small to be confident in the results on beta-carotene.

Which Sunscreen Should You Use?

Believe it or not: Up to 90% of visible aging comes from damage from UV exposure. This is particularly true in the case of premature aging.  As the study above indicates, the best protection from aging is sunscreen; but what’s the best sunscreen to use? Overall, I prefer physical-mineral sunscreens, such as zinc oxide and titanium dioxide (which physically stop the rays) over organic-chemical sunscreens like avobenzone and oxybenzone (which absorb UV rays and convert them into a less harmful form of energy). Both offer excellent levels of protection, but there are several reasons why physical-mineral sunscreens might be a better choice overall. Organic-chemical sunscreens are less photostable than physical-mineral sunscreens, and because of this, are more likely to cause irritation (Chemical Research in Toxicology). And organic-chemical sunscreens penetrate the skin more than physical-mineral sunscreens, which are too large to penetrate the past the stratum corneum (Journal of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Science, Toxicological Science). [Read More: Are Inorganic Sunscreens Better than Organic Ones?] And zinc oxide is a better physical blocker than titanium dioxide by virtue of having more broad-spectrum protection. There are two kinds of UV rays: UVA (aging) rays and UVB (burning) rays. Both block UVB rays, but zinc oxide blocks more UVA rays than titanium dioxide (Skin Pharmacology and Physiology). Here are some sunscreens that are either completely physical-mineral or a mix of physical-mineral and organic-chemical, along with the percentages of active ingredients in each, with high amounts of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide. Remember, the addition of an antioxidant serum, like our Vitamin CE Caffeic Serum, has been proven to help boost the effectiveness of sunscreen (Journal of Investigative Dermatology).Bottom LineIf you haven’t been wearing sunscreen every single day and reapplying it often, now is the time to start. This recent research study proves what past studies, dermatologists, and FutureDerm has been saying for years: Daily use of sunscreen will keep you looking younger longer, and will help prevent skin cancer. Thinking of sunscreen application like brushing your teeth, something you do regularly, can make a huge difference in your skin in the long run.

Via Future Derm

How Much Sunscreen Should You Be Applying?

Be sure you’re applying enough sunscreen with a shot glass and a teaspoon!

 

Apply a shot glass of sunscreen to your entire body (4 oz.) and a 1/4 tsp of sunscreen to your face to ensure you’re getting the right amount.

New Years Resolutions – Good Habits for 2013!

 

Hands.Pen.Paper.DupontCircle.WDC.17sep05 (Photo credit: ElvertBarnes)

The Coming New Year is a great time to put new good habits into practice!

  • Drink more water
  • Wear sunblock
  • Wear a hat
  • Exfoliate once to twice a week
  • Exercise, take a walk
  • Mediate
  • Yoga – get limber
  • Treat yourself to a massage, facial, manicure or pedicure (look good feel good!)
  • Start packing your own lunch
  • Sleep more, get better quality sleep
  • Drink less Alcohol!
  • Get more sleep
  • Quit Smoking!
  • Eat more fruits, veggies, and fiber
  • Try going organic

Have fun with it make a list of good habits you would like to start to do and make it happen!

Half a glass of water(Photo credit: Jeff Youngstrom)

 

The Difference Between Physical and Chemical Sunscreen!

Types of Sunscreen/Sunblock:  Chemical  Physical (also known as mineral sunscreen)  
 How does it protect you from the sun? Absorb Ultraviolet (UV) radiation, dissipating it as it heats Reflect or scatter ultraviolet (UV) radiation
UV Filters (active ingredients) FDA Approved listed:

  • Octylcrylene (also known as:  Uvinul N539T, OCR, Eusolex OCR)
  • Ensulizole (also known as:  Phenylbenzimiazole sulfonic acid,  PBSA, Eusolex 232,  Parsol HS)
  • Avobenzone (also known as:  Butyl methoxy-dibenzoyl-methane, Parsol 1789, Eusolex 9020, Escalol 517, BMBM)
  • Octinoxate (also known as:  Octyl methoxy-cinnamate, OMC,
    Ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate, EHMC, Escalol 557,  Parsol MCX, Eusolex 2292, Tinosorb OMC, Uvinul MC80)
  • Octisalate (also known as:  Octyl salicylate,  Ethylhexyl salicylate, EHS,  Escalol 587)
  • Oxybenzone (also known as:  Benzophenone-3,   BP3, Uvinul M40, Eusolex 4360, Escalol 567)
  • Helioplex
  • Homosalate (also known as:  Homomethyl salicylate & HMS)
  • Mexoryl SX and XL (also known as:  Terephthalylidene dicamphor  sulfonic acid, TDSA, Ecamsule, Drometrizole trisiloxane, Ecamsule)
  • Cinoxate (also known as:  2-Ethoxyethyl p-methoxycinnamate)
  • Dioxybenzone (also known as:  Benzophenone-8)
  • Meradimate (also known as:  Menthyl anthranilate)
  • Sulisobenzone (also known as:  Benzophenone-4,  BP4, Uvinul MS40, Escalol 577)
  • Trolamine salicylate (also known as:  Triethanolamine salicylate)
  • zinc oxide (also known as: ZnO, CI 77947, Nogenol, Pigment white 4,  Zinc gelatin)
  • Titanium oxide (also known as:  TiO2, CI Pigment white 6,  Titanium Peroxide, CI 77891, Pigment white 6)
Comedogenic Tendencies
(ability to clog pores)
Chemical filters tend to be more irritating to skin. *Some can cause allergic reactions. Causes less skin irritation than other UV absorbing chemicals.   Still can be problematic for some people.  *If you have breaks or reactions to mineral make up steer clear of physical sunscreen.
Level of Protection(look for broad-spectrum protection on label) Chemical filters offer more coverage against UVA and UVB rays than physical sunscreens. How much protection is offered depends on the particle size of the UV filters and overall product formulation.
FDA – Federal Drug Administration Generally safe, however some chemical filters generate free radicals which can make your skin age.Many chemical UV filters have not been FDA approved in the States, but are in sunscreens sold in other countries. Pretty safe, FDA approved.
Types of Ultraviolet (UV) Rays: (Wavelengths) UV-A UV-B UV-C
  This is the longest wavelength and is not absorbed by the ozone. It penetrates the skin deeper than UV-B. Responsible for sunburns. It is partially blocked by the ozone layer. This is totally absorbed by the earth’s atmosphere; we encounter it only from artificial radiation sources.
What is SPF? The Sun Protection Factor or SPF measures how effectively the sunscreen formula limits skin exposure to UV-B rays that burn the skin. The higher the SPF the more protection the sunscreen will provide against UV-B rays. SPF does not measure UV-A. If you are looking for UV-A protection, it is recommended that you purchase a product that has broad-spectrum protection.

Ultraviolet (UV) photons harm the DNA molecule...

Ultraviolet (UV) photons harm the DNA molecules of living organisms in different ways. In one common damage event, adjacent bases bond with each other, instead of across the “ladder.” This makes a bulge, and the distorted DNA molecule does not function properly. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Spring into Better Habits!

 

Hands.Pen.Paper.DupontCircle.WDC.17sep05

Hands.Pen.Paper.DupontCircle.WDC.17sep05 (Photo credit: ElvertBarnes)

Spring is a great time to put new good habits into practice!

  • Drink more water
  • Wear sunblock
  • Wear a hat
  • Exfoliate once to twice a week
  • Exercise, take a walk
  • Mediate
  • Yoga – get limber
  • Treat yourself to a massage, facial, manicure or pedicure (look good feel good!)
  • Start packing your own lunch
  • Sleep more, get better quality sleep
  • Drink less Alcohol!
  • Quit Smoking!
  • Eat more fruits, veggies, and fiber
  • Try going organic

Have fun with it make a list of good habits you would like to start to do and make it happen!

Half a glass of water

Half a glass of water (Photo credit: Jeff Youngstrom)

How to keep your hands looking youthful.

Protect and moisturize!

English: Female hands.

The two most important rules to youthful looking hands, so many peopleconcentrate on making their face look youthful, failing to take the time to care for their hands.

  Protect your hands by wearing gloves when doing dishes, working outdoors, keep your hands exposure to chemicals and water to a minimum and always moisturize them once clean.  Keep hand cream in convenient places so that you are sure to use it.  The kitchen and bathroom sink, your car, purse, and your desk at work are all great places.  Your daily daytime hand cream should have sun block for sun protection and lactic or glycolic acids, to protect and revitalize the skin.  At night apply a heavier hand cream.  You don’t need a hand cream with sun block at night.  For better penetration of the product wear cotton gloves to bed, this also helps if you touch your face or sleep on your hands at night to keep from transferring the heavy cream to your face causing break outs.

Use a face or body scrub to exfoliate your hands once to twice a week.  Don’t use pressure when using a scrub on any part of the body all you need is the light movement of your hand to have the scrub do its job.

Pay attention to your cuticles and nails.  You may want to buy cuticle/nail oil if they are very dry and peeling.  Apply a drop of oil to each nail and work into the cuticle and nail.

Facebook
Twitter
More...

%d bloggers like this: