The Importance of Hats for Sun Protection: The Brim of the Matter

We all know that a hat protects you from the sun, but

did you know for

every 1 inch of brim to your hat = a 10% lower risk of skin cancer to your face!

Ditch the baseball cap, look for brims that go all the way around the hat. Bonus many hats now offer added UPF protection, the Ultraviolet Protection Factor (UPF) rating system measures the UV protection provided by fabric.

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Siggi Bucket Boonie Cord Fishing Beach Cap Summer Sun Hat Wide Brim for Women UPF50+

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Simplicity Women’s Summer UPF 50+ Roll Up Floppy Beach Hat with Ribbon

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Coolibar UPF 50+ Men’s Shapeable Outback Sun Hat – Sun Protective

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Coolibar UPF 50+ Men’s Fairway Golf Hat – Sun Protective

Sun Protection In A Pill!


Credit: Thinkstock

Via New Beauty

Sun protection is perhaps the most important part of any skin-care regimen. Whether you live in a sunny or cloudy climate, sunscreen should be worn at all times. However, the task of applying and reapplying sunscreen can become extremely tedious. But it turns out that our constant cries for something easier have been answered in the form of a little pill.

Scientists have worked for years, if not decades, to develop an oral supplement that could provide adequate sun protection. The most current one, Heliocare ($28), has been given to patients who have had skin cancer and has been popular in Europe for several years. But is it too good to be true?

“I was very skeptical at first, however, after reviewing the white papers where the company took samples of patients’ skin and performed biochemical stains for cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers and 6, 4-photoproducts, which are markers for cancerous changes inside skin cells, there were substantially reduced damaged skin cells from UVA/UVB exposure,” says Fort Lauderdale, FL, dermatologist Will Richardson, MD. “Likewise, the study also demonstrated a reduction in immediate sunburn and immediate pigment darkening in patients on Heliocare 40 minutes after administration.”

While Dr. Richardson wouldn’t recommend this product as a stand-alone way to prevent sun damage, he says that it’s a great option for athletes or those who spend a lot of time outdoors. Just be sure to use a topical sunscreen for added protection. “Use a full spectrum sunblock that will provide UVB and UVA protection that is at least SPF 30 and has zinc oxide,” says Smithtown, NY, dermatologist Marina Peredo, MD.

 

The 3 Biggest SunScreen Mistakes You Are Making!

Credit: Thinkstock

You weren’t born yesterday, so you already know that the sun is bad for you. Sure, it facilitates life on earth, but it also wreaks hyperpigmentation-havoc (among other things, psst wrinkles) on your skin. And if the sun is the enemy in this little metaphor, consider sunscreen to be the soldier that shields you and goes to battle against harmful UV rays.

While SPF is a hero for sure, it can only really protect you from the aforementioned skin horrors if you are using it correctly. And most dermatologists agree, women, despite their best intentions, continue to make big mistakes when it comes to correctly using and applying sunscreen. Because the efficacy of sunscreens is directly related to how they are used, this is a big deal. So what are these big blunders? So glad you asked.

Not reapplying

It’s great you remember to put sunscreen on in the morning, however by the time the sun goes down at night, your one application in the morning has totally worn off. If you are in the sun, you need to be reapplying sunscreen every two hours, says New York dermatologist Rebecca Baxt, MD.

Layering SPFs

Using two products, say your moisturizer and foundation with sunblock in them, is fine, but thinking their SPF factors combine to be one larger, more powerful SPF is not. “Women think that the SPF 15 in their makeup plus their SPF40 in their sunblock, equals a 55, which is just not true,” says Dr. Baxt. In reality, the most you are getting is the highest level you apply, and that’s it.

Relying on SPF in makeup

Sunblock in makeup is usually enough to prevent a burn when used properly, but it isn’t enough to prevent all the harmful rays that age the skin and cause skin cancer, says Baxt. “Makeup products with SPF are usually between SPF 5 and 15, which is not appropriate for direct sun exposure. I always encourage my clients to wear a minimum of SPF 15 when exposed to the sun, and the higher the better!” adds New York dermatologist Dennis Gross, MD. “Makeup is also not applied everywhere that sunscreen should be, and we often miss the neck, ears and hairline,” he says.

UV Index App By Coppertone!

Diane Bondareff / AP Coppertone’s newly released “MyUV Alert” iPhone mobile app can be used to to look up a local UV index forecast. The free service also provides customizable sunscreen reapplication reminders and personalized suncare recommendations.

Android App

Apple App

When parents have to worry about sun protection, it’s no day at the beach. COPPERTONE® MyUVAlert™ to the rescue! This handy application helps you with sun protection information for your whole family, offering local UV index forecasts, custom sunscreen reapplication reminders that you set, individualized product recommendations, coupons, sun protection tips and more.

The COPPERTONE® MyUV Alert™ App offers:
• Custom reapplication reminders, which even allow for more frequent reminders when swimming or sweating. You can set reminders that work for you and your family, based on activity or personal preferences. Customize with choice of sounds.
• Sunscreen product profiles and recommendations tailored to each family member. You can even generate a recommendation list for the whole family at once, making shopping simple!
• Local UV index and weather forecasts, so preparing for your vacation (or staycation) becomes a breeze.
• Sun protection tips from the COPPERTONE® Solar Research Center.
• Valuable coupons for your favorite COPPERTONE® products.

Related Links:

 

The 3 Biggest Sunscreen Mistakes You’re Making

 

Credit: Thinkstock

You weren’t born yesterday, so you already know that the sun is bad for you. Sure, it facilitates life on earth, but it also wreaks hyperpigmentation-havoc (among other things, psst wrinkles) on your skin. And if the sun is the enemy in this little metaphor, consider sunscreen to be the soldier that shields you and goes to battle against harmful UV rays.

While SPF is a hero for sure, it can only really protect you from the aforementioned skin horrors if you are using it correctly. And most dermatologists agree, women, despite their best intentions, continue to make big mistakes when it comes to correctly using and applying sunscreen. Because the efficacy of sunscreens is directly related to how they are used, this is a big deal. So what are these big blunders? So glad you asked.

Not reapplying

It’s great you remember to put sunscreen on in the morning, however by the time the sun goes down at night, your one application in the morning has totally worn off. If you are in the sun, you need to be reapplying sunscreen every two hours, says New York dermatologist Rebecca Baxt, MD.

Layering SPFs

Using two products, say your moisturizer and foundation with sunblock in them, is fine, but thinking their SPF factors combine to be one larger, more powerful SPF is not. “Women think that the SPF 15 in their makeup plus their SPF40 in their sunblock, equals a 55, which is just not true,” says Dr. Baxt. In reality, the most you are getting is the highest level you apply, and that’s it.

Relying on SPF in makeup

Sunblock in makeup is usually enough to prevent a burn when used properly, but it isn’t enough to prevent all the harmful rays that age the skin and cause skin cancer, says Baxt. “Makeup products with SPF are usually between SPF 5 and 15, which is not appropriate for direct sun exposure. I always encourage my clients to wear a minimum of SPF 15 when exposed to the sun, and the higher the better!” adds New York dermatologist Dennis Gross, MD. “Makeup is also not applied everywhere that sunscreen should be, and we often miss the neck, ears and hairline,” he says.

 

UV Protection in Sunglasses!

Light-colored glasses can be just as effective as dark glasses at blocking UV light. Look for labels that say “Meets ANSI UV Requirements” or “UV absorption up to 400 nm,” which means the glasses will block 99% of UV rays, compared with about 70% for most cosmetic glasses.

 

Sunglasses are an important aspect of sun safety.

Why?

The eye area is a frequent site of skin cancer (5% to 10% of all skin cancers) and sun exposure can contribute to wrinkles around the eyes, hyperpigmentation, cataracts, macular degeneration, sunburn of the cornea also known as keratitis and several cancers of the eye.

 

sunglasses

sunglasses (Photo credit: Judy **)

Why you should prevent sunburns, especially for children!

One blistering sunburn doubles a

person’s lifetime risk of developing

Melanoma! 

A person’s risk for melanoma also

doubles if he or she has had five or

more sunburns at any age!

click her for more

Children, especially infants are at particular risk in the sun, because takes less time for them to get sunburned.  It can take less than 10 minutes for an infant’s skin to burn. Children tend to spend a lot of time outdoors and because they’re unlikely to be mindful of the sun’s dangers are more likely to get sunburned.

Title: Pathology: Patient: Melanoma Descriptio...

Title: Pathology: Patient: Melanoma Description: This slide shows a melanoma on a patient’s skin. Subjects (names): Topics/Categories: Pathology — Patient Type: Black & White Print. Color Slide Source: National Cancer Institute  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

UV Rays Fact!

 

Wear sunblock on cloudy days!

 

Clouds only filter out 20% of UV Rays, letting

 

80% pass through!

 

 

 

Clouds at sunset in Lynnwood, Washington.

Clouds at sunset in Lynnwood, Washington. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Not All Sunscreens Protect your Skin from Wrinkles, Age Spots, and Sunburn! FDA Announces Changes to Better Inform Consumers About Sunscreen!

 

Via Web MD

Some sunscreens protect against only UVB rays, which are the primary cause of sunburn, but UVA rays penetrate deeper into your skin. Both UVB and UVA exposure can lead to premature skin aging, skin cancer, and sunburn.

Only sunscreens labeled as both “Broad Spectrum” and “SPF 15″ (or higher) can reduce the risk of skin cancer, and reduce the risk of early skin aging — if they’re used regularly, as directed, and in combination with other sun protection measures that will help prevent sunburn. (The SPF – sun protection factor — rating refers only to the level of protection from UVB rays, not UVA rays.)

English: Two photographs of a man wearing suns...

English: Two photographs of a man wearing sunscreen (spf 50) on one half of his face, in visible light (left) and ultraviolet light (UV-A, 340-355nm) (right). The sunscreen on the left side of his face absorbs ultraviolet, making that side appear darker in the UV picture. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Via FDA PRESS RELEASE

FDA Announces Changes to Better Inform Consumers About Sunscreen

New Rules Give Consumers More Information to Help Reduce the Risk of Skin Cancer, Early Aging

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today that sunscreen products meeting modern standards for effectiveness may be labeled with new information to help consumers find products that, when used with other sun protection measures, reduce the risk of skin cancer and early skin aging, as well as help prevent sunburn.

The final regulation allows sunscreen products that pass the FDA’s test for protection against both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays to be labeled as “Broad Spectrum.” Both UVB and UVA radiation contribute to sunburn, skin cancer, and premature skin aging.   Sunburn is primarily caused by UVB radiation.

Under the new labeling, sunscreens labeled as both Broad Spectrum and SPF 15 (or higher), if used regularly, as directed, and in combination with other sun protection measures will help prevent sunburn, reduce the risk of skin cancer, and reduce the risk of early skin aging.

“FDA has evaluated the data and developed testing and labeling requirements for sunscreen products, so that manufacturers can modernize their product information and consumers can be well-informed on which products offer the greatest benefit,” said Janet Woodcock, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.  “These changes to sunscreen labels are an important part of helping consumers have the information they need so they can choose the right sun protection for themselves and their families.”

Products that have SPF values between 2 and 14 may be labeled as Broad Spectrum if they pass the required test, but only products that are labeled both as Broad Spectrum with SPF values of 15 or higher may state that they reduce the risk of skin cancer and early skin aging, when used as directed.

Any product that is not Broad Spectrum, or that is Broad Spectrum but has an SPF between 2 to 14, will be required to have a warning stating that the product has not been shown to help prevent skin cancer or early skin aging.

“Most skin cancers are caused by sun exposure. FDA encourages consumers to protect themselves,” Woodcock added.  “Not only should consumers regularly apply and reapply sunscreens with Broad Spectrum and SPF of 15 or higher, they should also limit sun exposure.”

In addition to the final rule for sunscreen labeling, today the FDA released three additional regulatory documents — a Proposed Rule, an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) for Dosage Forms, and a Draft Enforcement Guidance for Industry.

  • The proposed rule would limit the maximum SPF value on sunscreen labels to “50 +”, because there is not sufficient data to show that products with SPF values higher than 50 provide greater protection for users than products with SPF values of 50.  The proposal creates the opportunity for the submission of data to support including higher SPF values in the final rule. FDA looks forward to receiving public comment on this document.
  • The ANPR will allow the public a period of time to submit requested data addressing the effectiveness and the safety of sunscreen sprays and to comment on possible directions and warnings for sprays that the FDA may pursue in the future, among other issues regarding dosage forms for sunscreens.
  • The Draft Enforcement Guidance for Industry outlines information to help sunscreen product manufacturers understand how to label and test their products in light of the new final rule and other regulatory initiatives.

To ensure that sunscreen products meet modern safety standards, FDA is also currently reexamining the safety information available for active ingredients included in sunscreens marketed today. The ingredients in sunscreens marketed today have been used for many years and FDA does not have any reason to believe these products are not safe for consumer use.

The new regulations will become effective for most manufacturers in one year.  Manufacturers with annual sales less than $25,000 have two years to comply.

For more information:
www.fda.gov/sunscreen

Sunburn Protection Factor (SPF)

Sun Protection

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.

Beauty Tip for Sun Burns!

via RealSimple

Ice Cube Tray as Sunburn Soother

Aloe vera plant

Aloe vera plant (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A clever way to repurpose an everyday item.

Freeze cubes of aloe vera for instant sunburn relief when you forget the SPF.

FORMULA Z/S

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