The 3 UVs

The 3 UVs(3)

 

 

Created by CT Esthetic, can be shared with credit to CT Esthetic with link to site

 

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Do Clouds Really Protect You From UV Rays?

How Long Does Waterproof Sunblock Last?

A “water-resistant” label means the sunscreen works in the water

for about 40 minutes – 80 minutes in the water, no sunscreen is

completely waterproof.  Like all sunscreens, water-resistant

products should be reapplied after two hours, regardless of water

exposure, and after toweling off.

oceanocean (Photo credit: Stephen Edgar – Netweb)

The 3 Biggest SunScreen Mistakes You Are Making!

Credit: Thinkstock

You weren’t born yesterday, so you already know that the sun is bad for you. Sure, it facilitates life on earth, but it also wreaks hyperpigmentation-havoc (among other things, psst wrinkles) on your skin. And if the sun is the enemy in this little metaphor, consider sunscreen to be the soldier that shields you and goes to battle against harmful UV rays.

While SPF is a hero for sure, it can only really protect you from the aforementioned skin horrors if you are using it correctly. And most dermatologists agree, women, despite their best intentions, continue to make big mistakes when it comes to correctly using and applying sunscreen. Because the efficacy of sunscreens is directly related to how they are used, this is a big deal. So what are these big blunders? So glad you asked.

Not reapplying

It’s great you remember to put sunscreen on in the morning, however by the time the sun goes down at night, your one application in the morning has totally worn off. If you are in the sun, you need to be reapplying sunscreen every two hours, says New York dermatologist Rebecca Baxt, MD.

Layering SPFs

Using two products, say your moisturizer and foundation with sunblock in them, is fine, but thinking their SPF factors combine to be one larger, more powerful SPF is not. “Women think that the SPF 15 in their makeup plus their SPF40 in their sunblock, equals a 55, which is just not true,” says Dr. Baxt. In reality, the most you are getting is the highest level you apply, and that’s it.

Relying on SPF in makeup

Sunblock in makeup is usually enough to prevent a burn when used properly, but it isn’t enough to prevent all the harmful rays that age the skin and cause skin cancer, says Baxt. “Makeup products with SPF are usually between SPF 5 and 15, which is not appropriate for direct sun exposure. I always encourage my clients to wear a minimum of SPF 15 when exposed to the sun, and the higher the better!” adds New York dermatologist Dennis Gross, MD. “Makeup is also not applied everywhere that sunscreen should be, and we often miss the neck, ears and hairline,” he says.

UV Index App By Coppertone!

Diane Bondareff / AP Coppertone’s newly released “MyUV Alert” iPhone mobile app can be used to to look up a local UV index forecast. The free service also provides customizable sunscreen reapplication reminders and personalized suncare recommendations.

Android App

Apple App

When parents have to worry about sun protection, it’s no day at the beach. COPPERTONE® MyUVAlert™ to the rescue! This handy application helps you with sun protection information for your whole family, offering local UV index forecasts, custom sunscreen reapplication reminders that you set, individualized product recommendations, coupons, sun protection tips and more.

The COPPERTONE® MyUV Alert™ App offers:
• Custom reapplication reminders, which even allow for more frequent reminders when swimming or sweating. You can set reminders that work for you and your family, based on activity or personal preferences. Customize with choice of sounds.
• Sunscreen product profiles and recommendations tailored to each family member. You can even generate a recommendation list for the whole family at once, making shopping simple!
• Local UV index and weather forecasts, so preparing for your vacation (or staycation) becomes a breeze.
• Sun protection tips from the COPPERTONE® Solar Research Center.
• Valuable coupons for your favorite COPPERTONE® products.

Related Links:

 

How to Fix Your Gel Manicure: Follow This Advice!

Reblogged from InStyle
Courtesy Photo

Gel polish may last longer than regular formulas, but—oops!— sometimes even the strongest manicure can chip.

IF YOU DID IT YOURSELF: First smooth the chipped area by gently buffing the nail’s surface. According to manicurist Jin Soon Choi, if you used an at-home kit spot apply two coats of color on top of the chip, curing each one as directed. Apply topcoat and cure it again for a quick remedy!

IF YOU WENT TO A SALON: If you got your mani done in a salon, find a close shade in a regular polish, touch up the area, and then apply a high gloss topcoat. “CND and OPI have regular and gel polish with the same names, so it’s easy to match those up,” says manicurist Julie Kandalec.

 

Dietary Lycopene to Help with UV Rays

Via BBC

Tomatoes and Skin Protection

Can tomatoes protect your skin?

There is a magical component in tomatoes that research is beginning to show could protect our skin from UV damage from sunburn. It’s called lycopene and it is a very effective antioxidant.

About 85% of lycopene in the western diet is obtained only from tomatoes and the best place to find it is in tomato paste.

Our test was to establish whether eating tomato paste could help protect the skin from UV damage and UV-induced reddening. We took 23 women who were used to burning merely at the sight of the sun and asked half of them to eat 55g of tomato paste every day for 12 weeks (giving them 16mg of lycopene).

“an unbelievable 30% increase in skin protection”

As a defence against UV rays, the body tans when exposed to moderate levels of radiation. This helps to block UV penetration and prevent damage to the vulnerable skin tissues deeper down. In order to test the efficacy of tomatoes on our guinea pigs we tested the lowest dose of UV needed to provoke a visible response on their skin. Then we exposed them to a range of UV radiation and compared the damage done to those who ate tomatoes and those who didn’t.

After 12 weeks of rigorously following the tomato paste diet we brought our women back to the lab and burnt them all over again. Was it all in vain? When tested again our volunteers on the lycopene diet had a 30% increase in skin protection.

This doesn’t mean that you should stop using sun block but it’s good to know that simply by increasing tomatoes in your diet you can help protect your skin from the daily sun damage which happens without us even realising.

______________________________________________________________

More reading Via The National Center for Biotechnology Information (USA)

What is the Best Way to Get Vitamin D? Sun or Diet?

According to the American Cancer Society, “Whenever possible, it is better to get vitamin D from your diet or vitamin supplements rather than from sun exposure because dietary sources and vitamin supplements do not increase risk for skin cancer, and are typically more reliable ways to get the amount you need.”

Vitamin D can be found in:

  • eggs
  • fish
  • fortified milk
  • fortified yogurt
  • fortified cereals
  • fortified bread

 

Sunscreen limits the amount of sun rays hitting your skin, so wearing sunscreen will decrease your skin’s production of vitamin D.

Deutsch: Palette mit Hühnereiern auf dem Woche...

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There are numerous Vitamin D benefits for your skin and overall health and skin care problems such as psoriasis.

Vitamin d is a fat-soluble vitamin and a powerful antioxidant and anti-carcinogen. It exists in several forms, Calciferol is the most active form of the vitamin. Once produced or ingested, the liver and kidneys act on the vitamin d to convert it into an active form that the body can use. It helps in the formation of healthy and strong teeth, bones, skin, and nails. Calcitriol the hormonally active form of vitamin D has antimicrobial properties, that helps to prevents several skin diseases, provides protection from UV damage, and protection to the hair follicle.

Some new research associates vitamin D with helping rosacea.  Peptides known as cathelicidins and the proteolytic enzymes that activate cathelicidins in the skin are believed to be abnormal in patients with rosacea.  Cathelicidins are antimicrobial peptides and the enzymes in the skin of rosacea sufferers cause them to produce these peptides in an abnormal form.  Follow up research suggests rosacea patients’ immune systems maybe abnormal.  Enzymes in the skin of rosacea sufferers may cause them to produce antimicrobial peptides in an atypical form.  A study in Belgium has recently made a connection between the regulation of these peptides and vitamin D.

 

Disclaimer

While I’ve attempted to use credible sources for information, this is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment. If there is a disparity between the information presented within this blog and the advice given by your medical professional, please follow the medical professional’s advice as he/she will know you and your medical circumstances.

 

How long Can I stay in the water with water-resistant sunscreen on?

A “water-resistant” label means the sunscreen works in the water

for about 40 minutes – 80 minutes in the water, no sunscreen is

completely waterproof.  Like all sunscreens, water-resistant

products should be reapplied after two hours, regardless of water

exposure, and after toweling off.

ocean

ocean (Photo credit: Stephen Edgar – Netweb)

 

The 3 Biggest Sunscreen Mistakes You’re Making

 

Credit: Thinkstock

You weren’t born yesterday, so you already know that the sun is bad for you. Sure, it facilitates life on earth, but it also wreaks hyperpigmentation-havoc (among other things, psst wrinkles) on your skin. And if the sun is the enemy in this little metaphor, consider sunscreen to be the soldier that shields you and goes to battle against harmful UV rays.

While SPF is a hero for sure, it can only really protect you from the aforementioned skin horrors if you are using it correctly. And most dermatologists agree, women, despite their best intentions, continue to make big mistakes when it comes to correctly using and applying sunscreen. Because the efficacy of sunscreens is directly related to how they are used, this is a big deal. So what are these big blunders? So glad you asked.

Not reapplying

It’s great you remember to put sunscreen on in the morning, however by the time the sun goes down at night, your one application in the morning has totally worn off. If you are in the sun, you need to be reapplying sunscreen every two hours, says New York dermatologist Rebecca Baxt, MD.

Layering SPFs

Using two products, say your moisturizer and foundation with sunblock in them, is fine, but thinking their SPF factors combine to be one larger, more powerful SPF is not. “Women think that the SPF 15 in their makeup plus their SPF40 in their sunblock, equals a 55, which is just not true,” says Dr. Baxt. In reality, the most you are getting is the highest level you apply, and that’s it.

Relying on SPF in makeup

Sunblock in makeup is usually enough to prevent a burn when used properly, but it isn’t enough to prevent all the harmful rays that age the skin and cause skin cancer, says Baxt. “Makeup products with SPF are usually between SPF 5 and 15, which is not appropriate for direct sun exposure. I always encourage my clients to wear a minimum of SPF 15 when exposed to the sun, and the higher the better!” adds New York dermatologist Dennis Gross, MD. “Makeup is also not applied everywhere that sunscreen should be, and we often miss the neck, ears and hairline,” he says.

 

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