Cell Phone = Tech Neck (Neck Pain and Wrinkles!)

Collagen Loss – Aging!

Did you know?

You loose 1% of collagen every year after the age of 30!

30% of your collagen is lost in the first five years after menopause.

Why?

The skin’s ability to replace damaged collagen diminishes and more gaps and irregularities develop in the mesh of collagen. Estrogen is stored in fat, so dieters will look older & faster if they are being too extreme in the dieting.

What is collagen?

It is the main structural protein of the various connective tissues it makes up 25% to 35% of the whole-body protein content.

What about hyaluronic acid?

type of protein, and works with keratin to provide the skin with strength, smoothness, elasticity and resilience. – See more at: http://www.healthcentral.com/skin-care/c/742375/55533/increase-eating/#sthash.Sx77dUZh.dpuf

Aside from hyaluronic acid production. Hyaluronic acid is naturally found in a multitude of tissues throughout our body such as skin and cartilage, according to the National Institutes of Health. It is needed for wound healing, cartilage and joint functioning, pain management, tissue repair and skin regeneration.

Estrogen also affects collagen and elastin levels. And hormonal dips thin the skin, making it less pliable.This process eventually leads to wrinkles.
Some causes of collagen are: sun damage, free radicals, some age-related hormonal changes, prescription/illegal drugs and smoking.

Peptides, growth factors, and retinols will help rebuild the collagen, but elastin is difficult to replace. When topical applications don’t work any more try lasers, ultrasonic, high frequency and injectable fillers to plump out the padding.

What is elastin?

It is responsible for elasticity, so skin becomes looser and less flexible over time. Wrinkles happen when the skin becomes looser than the tissue underneath, you’ll start seeing fine lines is around the eyes, where skin is the thinnest.

What’s Next for the World of Injectables!

New products are constantly being developed, tested and brought to market. Here are the latest offerings that you can expect to see soon.

Xeomin: Xeomin works toward the same goal as Botox and Dysport—blocking nerve impulses to the injected muscles—but the difference is in how it is manufactured. New York dermatologist Jennifer MacGregor, MD, explains that Xeomin is void of complex proteins. “Some people make antibodies to the proteins in other neurotoxins. If you’re resistant to the proteins and don’t see much of a benefit, Xeomin may be an option.” It also doesn’t need to be refrigerated like other neurotoxins do.

Belotero: The latest FDA approved hyaluronic acid filler to come to market, this one differs from others in that it is more lightweight. Its smoother consistency allows for it to fill in smaller, more superficial lines, like those around the mouth, and thinner-skinned areas such as under the eyes—it won’t give the skin a bluish tint that many other fillers can. It can be used to correct and fill nasolabial folds, too. But, because it is less cross-linked (lightweight), it may not last as long.

Related: FDA Approves Botox for Crow’s-Feet

Juvéderm Voluma: The thickest hyaluronic acid to date, Juvéderm Voluma is a short-chain filler that’s highly cross-linked so the hyaluronic acid molecules stick together and last longer. “It allows you to literally pick the face up,” West Palm Beach, FL, dermatologist Kenneth R. Beer, MD explains. While not a line filler, it’s anticipated to be used on the chin, cheekbones, temples and nose to correct volume loss.

Dry Hyaluronic Acid: A completely different type of application, this filler sits on a string and is threaded under the skin to hydrate and swell the area. “Basically, the filler is inserted under the skin and either pulled or pushed the length of the nasolabial crease in a manner similar to how doctors used to put in Gortex,” says Dr. Beer. “It attracts and absorbs water to fill in the area and add volume. But I’m not sure if this method is any better than injecting hyaluronic acid with a needle.”

Know Before You Go: Fillers and injectables may seem to be available almost anywhere, but that doesn’t mean you should go just anywhere to get them. These are cosmetic procedures that need to be performed by a well-trained, educated, medical doctor, like a or plastic surgeon or dermatologist, who specializes in facial anatomy and the effects of aging. “I don’t recommend having them done by a doctor who isn’t familiar with facial anatomy or by anyone at a salon, spa or someone’s house,” says Dr. Beer.

 

Via New Beauty

Something You Wish Your Mother Told You! Neck & Decollete: Don’t Forget About Taking Care of Them!

Start early in caring for your neck & decollete!

A big mistake that women make is focusing solely on their face and forgetting about caring for their neck and decolletage!

This leads to wrinkles and sagging that could have been prevented!

I recommend that whatever you do to your face; whether it be cleansing, moisturizing, exfoliating, applying sunblock, microdermabrasion, chemical peels et cetera that you include you neck and decollete too!

It only takes an additional minute or two more in your skin care routine and will make all the difference later on in life!

You don’t necessarily need to go out and buy a cream specifically for your neck and decollete, if you start early in caring for those body parts.

Revision Skin Care Nectifirm

I do love Nectifirm if you are looking to buy a cream specific for the neck and decollete.

Do Straws Cause Lip Lines And Wrinkles?

I’ve noticed that the “smoker lip wrinkles” are very common in aging skin, obviously more so if someone is a smoker (and I’m not even going to go on my rant about how I feel about smoking) . Other than being a smoker, believe it or not, most cases I’ve seen are from being an avid straw user! Do you realize how often you are drinking from a straw?

I’ll confess that I use a straw for almost every drink, usually just so I don’t have to reapply my lipgloss! Ooopsie!

If you think about it, it’s just another reccuring muscle motion we make, just like frowning and laughing will both cause wrinkles. Some people may or may not be prone to lip wrinkles, but other leading factors could be how you are taking care of your skin in that area. Are you getting enough hydration? i.e. creams, masks, water intake. Do you purse your lips while talking? Some people don’t even realize it! Do you drink a lot of hot fluids? Usually if you are “testing the waters” while your drink is cooling down you are using a pursed lip to check it out.

For those ladies who already have these “smoker lip wrinkles” and are looking for treatment, I have seen a combination of botox and fillers for a nice youthful look! There are many alternative treatments  to injections but a couple I would recommend are Laser Genisis and Fraxel.

Via Huffington Post

Sure, we know that sun exposure, dehydration and general aging leads to wrinkles. But what about those other seemingly-harmless habits that are also contributing to the cause, like sipping through a drinking straw? Beauty-wise, we’ve always thought straws fought off teeth stains, but is this very regular habit actually prematurely aging the skin around the mouth?

In this week’s installment of Beauty Myths, we spoke with dermatologists Dr. Heather Woolery-Lloyd, founder of Specific Beauty, and Dr. Rebecca Baxt, to help set the record straight.

“Yes, repeated straw drinking causes people to purse their lips and can create wrinkles from the repetitive muscle motion,” Baxt tells us. “Much like frowning causes wrinkles on the upper face.”

However, Woolery-Lloyd is wary of placing all the blame on drinking straws. “In general, drinking through a straw should not cause wrinkles,” she says. “However, any repetitive movement can increase the risk of wrinkles.”

But if there is indeed an issue with repeated movement, how often are we talking? Someone who sips through a straw daily, or less often, such as once a week? To compare, Woolery-Lloyd referred to the much more damaging habit of smoking.

“For example, smoking probably causes wrinkles for two reasons,” she says. “One is all of the free radical damage caused by smoking, and two is the repetitive movement of pursing the lips to inhale. Heavy smokers probably do that for five minutes 20 times or more per day. If we apply that example to using a straw, it would be to use a straw to drink at least 20 drinks a day, which most people could not do. In addition, using a straw does not cause any free radical damage to the skin. So, even if someone pursed their lips to use a straw for 100 minutes a day (like the smoker does to smoke cigarettes), they would not have the same effects as the smoker did.”

Baxt echoes that sentiment, telling us that she “[doesn’t] think once a week or less would be problematic, but in people who are prone to lip and mouth wrinkles, I tell them to avoid straws altogether.”

With smoking and now straw sipping on the “avoid” list, what else could lead to lip lines and wrinkles around the mouth? “Some people are mouth pursers as they speak, and I tell them to try to avoid pursing their lips and to try to break the habit,” Baxt says. “Also, lots of hot liquid drinking causes people to purse their lips.”

Woolery-Lloyd notes the obvious actions, like smiling, which “tends to cause ‘laugh lines,’ the lines from your nose to the angle of your lips.” But she also emphasizes common sense with wearing sunscreen. “Excessive sun exposure leads to photo-aging, so if you have a genetic predisposition to lip lines, then sun bathing without protection would make those lip lines worse.”

Conclusion: Repeated movement around the mouth — which could include sipping through straws, pursing the lips and most importantly, smoking — can contribute to lines and wrinkles.

For Beauty Myths, we’ve enlisted the help of pros to help debunk and demystify some of the most popular advice out there. Do you have a myth you’d like us to investigate? Let us know in the comment section, and check out previous questions in the gallery below.

Face Yoga Exercises!

CT Esthetic-

I personally question anything having to do with the face that has to do with repetitive movement are we just creating wrinkles in different places? Such as sucking on a straw, smoking a cigarette, squinting from the sun. Yes, we are stretching and strengthening the numerous muscles of the face that I can definitely agree upon when doing facial exercises or facial yoga.  To me the jury is still out on whether or not facial exercises or yoga works.  I do believe that facial massage is fabulous!!!

I will let you decide for yourself!

By ANNA PURSGLOVE  Via Daily Mail

We know the ‘lotus’ and the ‘downward-facing dog’ – but there’s a new set of yoga poses in town. Could you manage ‘the owl’? How about ‘the puffer fish’?

Face yoga is the beauty trend of the moment. Fans say it can smooth wrinkles, firm jawlines and create a healthy glow, as well as easing eye strain and headaches.

Fresh-faced stars Gwyneth Paltrow and Jennifer Aniston are said to use it as a weapon in their anti-ageing armoury.

Owl: Make two 'C' shapes with the fingers round the eyes, then relax the forehead and open the eyes wide. Repeat three times then hold for ten seconds.
Owl: Make two ‘C’ shapes with the fingers round the eyes, then relax the forehead and open the eyes wide. Repeat three times then hold for ten seconds
The V: Make a 'V' sign by positioning fingers at each end of the eyebrows and create a powerful squint. Relax and repeat six more times. Finish by squeezing eyes shut for ten seconds. Relax
The V: Make a ‘V’ sign by positioning fingers at each end of the eyebrows and create a powerful squint. Relax and repeat six more times. Finish by squeezing eyes shut for ten seconds. Relax
Circle the eyes: Place index fingers at the edge of eyebrows. Tap gently round eyes following the arc of the eyebrows and continue under the eyes. Repeat the opposite way. Stroke outwards under the eyes from the nose four times
Circle the eyes: Place index fingers at the edge of eyebrows. Tap gently round eyes following the arc of the eyebrows and continue under the eyes. Repeat the opposite way. Stroke outwards under the eyes from the nose four times
Puffer Fish: Puff out cheeks and make mouth as small as possible. Gently tap cheeks with hands for 30 seconds
Puffer Fish: Puff out cheeks and make mouth as small as possible. Gently tap cheeks with hands for 30 seconds.

The UK’s foremost ‘face yoga’ practitioner is Danielle Collins – and Julia Anastasiou is her first UK ‘face yoga Super Trainer’. For £65 an hour, Julia will teach you a 20-minute programme that she says can change your face for ever.

The exercises are designed to be carried out six times a week and, she claims, can yield results in only seven days. Devotees say it can knock up to five years off your face – and that it’s better than Botox.

The 18 separate facial poses can be done either in one sitting or manageable chunks. I might, for example, have time for a ‘tongue twister’ while sitting in traffic, but leave the more challenging ‘giraffe’ for the privacy of my own bathroom.

The Giraffe: Tilt the head back while stroking the neck. Bring the head down. Repeat twice, then jut lower lip, place fingers on collarbone and point chin upwards, pulling corners of mouth down. Hold for four deep breaths
The Giraffe: Tilt the head back while stroking the neck. Bring the head down. Repeat twice, then jut lower lip, place fingers on collarbone and point chin upwards, pulling corners of mouth down. Hold for four deep breaths
Hamster Cheeks: Puff out cheeks and purse lips. Transfer air from cheek to cheek for 30 seconds
Hamster Cheeks: Puff out cheeks and purse lips. Transfer air from cheek to cheek for 30 seconds

The theory is that the skin is tightened as the facial muscles are toned through specific movements.

This also encourages the production of collagen, the protein that keeps skin elastic and gives it a plump, youthful feel.

Julia believes face yoga is growing in popularity because of the risks associated with Botox and fillers, and the fear of puffiness which can be caused by these treatments.

‘Face yoga will give you the perkiness you might associate with cosmetic procedures, but it won’t stop you looking like you,’ she says.

Other yoga aficionados, however, are sceptical. James Muthana, founder of yoga instruction company YogaAt.com, says it lacks ‘the breathing elements or the sense of  presence and greater awareness which you get with yoga’.

So can face yoga give me an ‘all-natural face lift’?

Jaw Toner: Gently pinch along jawline three times towards the ears. Place the thumbs on the bottom of the jawline. Drag them along the jaw away from each other three times, removing them when you reach the ears
Jaw Toner: Gently pinch along jawline three times towards the ears. Place the thumbs on the bottom of the jawline. Drag them along the jaw away from each other three times, removing them when you reach the ears
Kiss the Sky: Tilt head back and kiss ten times (actually make a kissing sound). Relax, take a deep breath then exhale as though blowing a kiss in front of you. Relax and repeat twice more
Kiss the Sky: Tilt head back and kiss ten times (actually make a kissing sound). Relax, take a deep breath then exhale as though blowing a kiss in front of you. Relax and repeat twice more
Relaxation: Gently tap fingertips all over the face, then rub palms until they become warm and cup them over closed eyes. Take deep breaths and relax all facial muscles. Take a deep breath to finish
Relaxation: Gently tap fingertips all over the face, then rub palms until they become warm and cup them over closed eyes. Take deep breaths and relax all facial muscles. Take a deep breath to finish

Before we begin, Julia points out that although you’re using your fingers like gym weights to push down your muscles, you have to be gentle, as the skin around the eyes is the thinnest on the body.
Also, most of the 57 muscles in the face and neck are small and don’t need to be yanked too much to see a result.

We start with ‘the owl’ – one of the hardest exercises. While making two ‘c’ shapes with my fingers around my eyes, I must relax my forehead and open my eyes wide.

I find myself either squinting to smooth my forehead or wrinkling my forehead to raise my eyes.

We move on to ‘flirty eyes’. While covering my teeth with my lips, I form my mouth into an ‘O’ shape. Then I am told to place my index fingers horizontally under my eyes.

In this position, I am told to flutter my upper eyelids and lashes. For 30 seconds. I have rarely felt this ridiculous.

There are a few exercises in the 18-step programme that I’m sure I remember my grandmother doing: pinching the apples of the cheeks or along the jawline towards your ears (‘rosy cheeks’ and ‘jaw toner’).

I make it to the final relaxation step: gently tap your fingers all over your face, then finish with a deep breath.

Do I feel younger and more invigorated? I’m certainly flushed – but that may be because I haven’t been so embarrassed in a while.

So can facial contortions stop the ageing process? I’ll have to get back to you on that in a few years.

A week of practice hasn’t made a visible difference to my skin.

Meanwhile, if you spot women blowing kisses to heaven, or grimacing like mad hatters in their cars, then you’ll know face yoga has reached your neighbourhood.

faceyogalondon.co.uk

Celebrity Dermatologist Dr. Ava Shamban – Skin Videos!


Before considering a cosmetic treatment, Santa Monica dermatologist, Ava Shamban, MD, says she tells her clients to pick their “signature feature” or the physical quality that they think best represents them.


Extreme Makeover: Dr. Ava Reduces Ray’s Extreme Acne Scars


Studio 11 Los Angeles: Dr. Ava Shamban on Botox Brow Lift and Wrinkle Prevention


Dr. Ava Shamban Talks about Dysport


Sublative effective on firming up sagging neck – as seen on The Doctors


FOX11 Studio 11 LA: Dr. Ava Shamban Reduces Excess Underarm Sweating with MiraDry

Great Skin – – Don’t Forget to Exercise! The Beauty Benefits to Execise!

Working out not only helps your figure, but also improves your complexion!

Ready to Fight

Instant Glow

It’s hardly news that exercise is great for your heart, lungs, and mental outlook. Here’s another reason to get moving: Regular exercise is one of the keys to healthy skin.  “We tend to focus on the cardiovascular benefits of physical activity, and those are important. But anything that promotes healthy circulation also helps keep your skin healthy and vibrant,” says dermatologist Ellen Marmur, MD, author of Simple Skin Beauty: Every Woman’s Guide to a Lifetime of Healthy, Gorgeous Skin and associate professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.  When you get your heart pumping from aerobic exercise, you’re supplying your skin with a nice dose of oxygenated blood, says Noëlle S. Sherber, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist based in Baltimore, Maryland. “It gives you that great post-workout glow.”

Yoga is also great for your skin!  All poses that Practitioners of yoga twist, contort and stretch their bodies into poses called asanas while using focused breath patterns to achieve a state of exertion, control, meditation and oneness between mind and body can benefit the skin.

Wrinkle Reduction and Acne Relief

Working out also helps maintain healthy levels of the stress-related hormone cortisol, Sherber says. “Elevated cortisol levels are linked to increased sebum production, which means more acne breakouts,” she says. Too much cortisol can also cause the collagen in the skin to break down, Sherber says, which can increase wrinkles and sagging. “Exercise actually supports the production of collagen,” says Amy Dixon, a Los Angeles–based exercise physiologist and celebrity trainer. “The boost in this protein helps to keep your skin firm, supple, and elastic.”

Regular exercise boosts circulation. “It nourishes your skin, bringing more blood flow and oxygen to it,” says Mauro C. Romita, M.D., a board-certified plastic surgeon and founder of Ajune Center for Beauty Synergy in New York City. “This will help draw toxins out of the body.” Plus, all that sweating cleans out the pores of congested skin. “Working out corrects the hormonal imbalance that can cause adult acne,” Romita says.

To reap the beneficial skin effects of working out, a few extra steps are required, Sherber warns. “If you’re acne prone, make sure to keep gentle, fragrance-free cleansing wipes in your gym bag.” Be sure to cleanse your face and other areas that tend to break out immediately after exercising, she says. “For eczema, wear fabrics that wick perspiration away from the skin, since the wet-dry-wet-dry cycle will dry out your skin and provoke flare-ups,” Sherber says. And above all, avoid exercising with makeup on your face.

First, let’s talk a little bit about how acne forms. Glands in the follicles of your skin produce sebum, an oil that lubricates your skin. As sebum works its way to the surface, it carries with it dead skin cells. Occasionally, the sebum and skin cell mixture clogs a pore. Then, bacteria shows up, which ultimately leads to inflammation and acne.

What does this have to do with yoga? Well, yoga has been shown time and again to be an effective way of relieving not only stress, but the hormone that goes hand-in-hand with feelings of stress: cortisol

.

When you experience stress, your adrenal glands release cortisol. The presence of cortisol then triggers numerous changes throughout your body, one of which is increased production of sebum, which contributes heavily to blockages and acne. Because yoga lowers cortisol, and cortisol is a contributing factor of acne, it stands to reason that yoga can help clear up acne.

When first starting yoga, the increase in sweating may exacerbate blockages that have already formed, bringing those problems to the forefront at once. Many report that it takes about a month for skin to show benefit from yoga.

Yoga can clear up acne — for some people. If you practice yoga regularly, have accounted for factors such as makeup and cleanliness, and continue having problems with acne, it’s possible that heredity plays a larger role for you. Yoga will, however, help improve your skin tone and texture overall, and can be just one part of a larger campaign for healthier looking skin.

yoga

Most exercise-related acne is the result of several controllable factors. Some tips:

  • Don’t wear make up while exercising!  Always remove your make up by washing your face before exercising!
  • Wash your hands and face both before and after performing yoga.
  • Though sweating is good, it leaves behind salt that can clog pores, so shower afterward.
  • Stay away from clothes that are too tight — especially those made of synthetic fibers. Constant friction against your skin can cause acne mechanica, which is common among athletes and physically active people.
  • Make sure your yoga mat or other equipment is clean, or it can become a home for bacteria.
  • Don’t use your hand to wipe hair or sweat away from your face.

Women Push Ups

Healthier Hair

The improved blood flow helps keep your hair stronger and healthier, Dixon says. This blood, full of nutrients, stimulates the hair follicles and promotes growth. “Exercise is also a big stress reliever,” she says. “Lower stress means your hair is less likely to be brittle and, worse, fall out.” Even if you’re as stress free as a cucumber, Dixon recommends checking with your dermatologist about any hair loss to rule out other causes.

As for the best type of exercise for your skin, Dixon says it’s all good. “Every modality will improve circulation and reduce stress,” she says, “but it’s a wise move to mix up your workouts as often as possible.” Try adding 30 minutes of a few simple yoga postures or a brisk walk to your day three times a week, Dixon says, to see the beauty returns in your hair and skin.

Excerpts from Daily Glow, WebMD, and Discovery (Health and Fitness)
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